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Long-term survival with mixed chimerism in patients with AML and MDS transplanted after conditioning with targeted busulfan, fludarabine, and thymoglobulin

Bone Marrow Transplant

2022 Albert Yeh; Howard Schoch; Fred Appelbaum; H. Joachim Deeg; Mary Flowers; Theodore Gooley; Paul Martin; Kristine Doney; Mohamed Sorror; Barry Storer

We evaluated long-term outcome in 40 patients with MDS or AML, transplanted from related or unrelated donors following conditioning with targeted busulfan (Bu, over 4 days), fludarabine (Flu, 120 [n = 23] or 250 [n = 17] mg/m2) and thymoglobulin (THY). Compared to 95 patients conditioned with Bu/Cyclophosphamide (Cy) without THY, BuFluTHY-conditioned patients had lower rates of chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD). Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for BuFlu(120)THY and BuFlu(250)THY-conditioned patients were 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-3.86) and 1.87 (0.68-5.11), respectively, for relapse; 0.77 (0.30-1.99) and 1.32 (0.54-3.23) for non-relapse mortality; 0.81 (0.42-1.57) and 1.38 (0.72-2.57) for overall mortality; and 0.78 (0.30-2.05) and 1.62 (0.63-4.41) for relapse or death (failure for relapse-free survival). At one year, 45% of BuFlu(120 or 250)THY-conditioned patients had mixed CD3+ chimerism compared to 0% with BuCy (p < 0.0001). None of 7 patients with long-term mixed chimerism had chronic GVHD; two relapsed, five remained stable mixed chimeras. THY is effective in reducing chronic GVHD, and long-term mixed T-cell chimerism can be compatible with relapse-free survival. However, Thy may also be associated with an increased risk of relapse and, dose-dependent, with non-relapse mortality.

Multisite 11-year experience of less-intensive vs intensive therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

Blood

2021 Wendy Leisenring; Pamela Becker; Brenda Sandmaier; Fred Appelbaum; Barry Storer; Lynn Onstad; Stephanie Lee; Mohamed Sorror; Elihu Estey; Jeannine McCune; Mahmoud Elsawy

Less-intensive induction therapies are increasingly used in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using an AML composite model (AML-CM) assigning higher scores to older age, increased comorbidity burdens, and adverse cytogenetic risks, we defined 3 distinct prognostic groups and compared outcomes after less-intensive vs intensive induction therapies in a multicenter retrospective cohort (n = 1292) treated at 6 institutions from 2008 to 2012 and a prospective cohort (n = 695) treated at 13 institutions from 2013 to 2017. Prospective study included impacts of Karnofsky performance status (KPS), quality of life (QOL), and physician perception of cure. In the retrospective cohort, recipients of less-intensive therapies were older and had more comorbidities, more adverse cytogenetics, and worse KPS. Less-intensive therapies were associated with higher risks of mortality in AML-CM scores of 4 to 6, 7 to 9, and ≥10. Results were independent of allogeneic transplantation and similar in those age 70 to 79 years. In the prospective cohort, the 2 groups were similar in baseline QOL, geriatric assessment, and patient outcome preferences. Higher mortality risks were seen after less-intensive therapies. However, in models adjusted for age, physician-assigned KPS, and chance of cure, mortality risks and QOL were similar. Less-intensive therapy recipients had shorter length of hospitalization (LOH). Our study questions the survival and QOL benefits (except LOH) of less-intensive therapies in patients with AML, including those age 70 to 79 years or with high comorbidity burdens. A randomized trial in older/medically infirm patients is required to better assess the value of less-intensive and intensive therapies or their combination. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01929408.

Are hematopoietic cell transplant recipients with Gram-negative bacteremia spending more time outpatient while on intravenous antibiotics? Addressing trends over 10 years at a single center

Immun Inflamm Dis

2021 Anna Sweet; Steven Pergam; Mohamed Sorror; Catherine Liu; Frank Tverdek; Margaret Lind; Amanda Phipps

INTRODUCTION: The increasing proportion of outpatient allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) coupled with increased access of once-daily broad-spectrum antibiotics and evidence that outpatient antibiotic treatment may be safer and less costly than inpatient treatment, suggest that allogeneic HCT recipients with Gram-negative rod bacteremia (GNRBs) are increasingly being treated in ambulatory care settings. METHODS: Using data from the first GNRB event that occurred within the first 100 days posttransplantation among allogeneic HCT recipients transplanted at a single center between 2007 and 2016, we estimated the temporal trends in GNRB incidence and treatment management of GNRBs and identified if patient or infection characteristics impacted observed trends. RESULTS: A total of 11% (238/2165) of the observed allogeneic HCT recipients experienced 1 GNRB with available resistance data and contributed antibiotic treatment time. Patients, on average, received 55.1% of their antibiotic treatment in an outpatient setting and we observed a significant decline in the proportion of treatment time spent outpatient (crude: -3.3% [95% confidence interval: -5.0, -1.6%]). We observed similar declines in the proportion of treatment time spent outpatient among patients with similar GNRB and pretransplant complexity factors but not among patients with similar posttransplant complications (p value: .165). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that, despite increased availability of outpatient suitable treatment options, allogeneic HCT recipients with GNRBs received less treatment in outpatient settings. However, among patients with similar posttransplant complications, the lack of significant decline suggests that treatment location decisions remained consistent for patients with similar posttransplant complications. These findings suggest the need for additional interventions targeting outpatient antibiotic treatment among allogeneic HCT recipients with GNRBs.

Multisite 11-year experience of less-intensive vs intensive therapies in acute myeloid leukemia

Blood

2021 Fred Appelbaum; Elihu Estey; Stephanie Lee; Mohamed Sorror; Mahmoud Elsawy; Wendy Leisenring; Lynn Onstad; Jeannine McCune; Barry Storer; Pamela Becker; Brenda Sandmaier

Less-intensive induction therapies are increasingly used in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia, assuming they are better than intensive induction. Using an AML-composite model (AML-CM) that assigns higher scores to older age, increased comorbidity-burdens and adverse cytogenetic-risks, we defined three distinct prognostic groups, and within each, compared outcomes after less-intensive versus intensive induction therapies in a multicenter retrospective cohort (n=1292) treated at six institutions from 2008-2012 and a prospective cohort (n=695) treated at thirteen institutions from 2013-2017. Prospective study included impacts of Karnofsky performance status (KPS), quality of life (QOL), and physicians' perceptions of cure. In the retrospective cohort, recipients of less-intensive therapies were older, had more comorbidities, more adverse cytogenetics, and worse KPS. Less-intensive therapies were associated with higher risks for mortality in AML-CM scores of 4-6, 7-9, and ≥10. Results were independent from receipt of allogeneic transplants and similar in those aged 70-79 years old. In the Prospective cohort, the two groups were similar in baseline QOL, geriatric assessment, and patients' outcome preferences. Higher mortality risks were seen after less-intensive therapies. However, in models adjusted for age, physician-assigned KPS and chances of cure, mortality risks and QOL were similar. Less-intensive recipients had lessened length of hospitalization (LOH). Our studies question the survival or QOL, except LOH, benefits from less-intensive therapies in patients with AML, including those aged 70-79 years or with high comorbidity-burden. A randomized trial in older/medically infirm patients is needed to better assess the value of less-intensive, intensive, or a combination of both therapies. ClinicalTrials.gov #NCT01929408.

Breaking the Age Barrier: Physicians' Perceptions of Candidacy for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Older Adults

Transplant Cell Ther

2021 Mohamed Sorror

BACKGROUND: Despite continued increases in use of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) among older adults, no standardized geriatric assessment (GA) has been established to risk-stratify for transplant-related morbidity. We conducted a survey of transplant physicians to determine perceptions of the impact of older age (60 years) on alloHCT candidacy, and utilization of tools to gauge candidacy. METHODS: We conducted a 23-item, online cross-sectional survey of HCT physicians caring for adults in the United States between May and July 2019. RESULTS: Of the 770 invited HCT physicians, 175 (22.7%) completed the survey. The majority of respondents were 41-60 years old, male, and practiced in a higher volume teaching hospital. When considering regimen intensity, 29 physicians (17%) stated they would consider a myeloablative regimen for patients 70 years, and 141 (82%) would consider reduced intensity/non-myeloablative conditioning for patients 70 years. Almost all (90%) endorsed the need for a specialized assessment of pre-HCT vulnerabilities to guide candidacy decisions for older adults. Most physicians reported their centers rarely (33%) or never (46%) utilize a dedicated geriatrician/geriatric-oncologist to assess alloHCT candidates 60 years. Common barriers to performing a GA included uncertainty about which tools to use, lack of knowledge and training, and lack of appropriate clinical support staff. CONCLUSIONS: Many alloHCT physicians will consider alloHCT in patients up to age 75 years and not uncommonly, in patients older than that. However, application of tools and domains varies widely to assess candidacy in older adults. Incorporation of a standardized pre-transplant health assessment tool for risk stratification is a significant unmet need.

Impact of Pretransplantation Renal Dysfunction on Outcomes after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

Transplant Cell Ther

2021 Mohamed Sorror

Renal dysfunction is a recognized risk factor for mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT), yet our understanding of the effect of different levels of renal dysfunction at time of transplantation on outcomes remains limited. This study explores the impact of different degrees of renal dysfunction on HCT outcomes and examines whether the utilization of incremental degrees of renal dysfunction based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) improve the predictability of the hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI). The study population included 2 cohorts: cohort 1, comprising patients age ≥40 years who underwent alloHCT for treatment of hematologic malignancies between 2008 and 2016 (n = 13,505; cohort selected given a very low incidence of renal dysfunction in individuals age <40 years), and cohort 2, comprising patients on dialysis at the time of HCT (n = 46). eGFR was measured using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) method. The patients in cohort 1 were assigned into 4 categories-eGFR ≥90 mL/min (n = 7062), eGFR 60 to 89 mL/min (n = 5264), eGFR 45 to 59 mL/min (n = 897), and eGFR <45 mL/min (n=282)-to assess the impact of degree of renal dysfunction on transplantation outcomes. Transplantation outcomes in patients on dialysis at the time of alloHCT were analyzed separately. eGFR <60 mL/min was associated with an increased risk for nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and requirement for dialysis post-HCT. Compared with the eGFR ≥90 group, the hazard ratio (HR) for NRM was 1.46 (P = .0001) for the eGFR 45 to 59 mL/min group and 1.74 (P = .004) for the eGFR <45 mL/min group. Compared with the eGFR ≥90 mL/min group, the eGFR 45 to 59 mL/min group (HR, 2.45; P < .0001) and the eGFR <45 mL/min group (HR, 3.09; P < .0001) had a higher risk of renal failure necessitating dialysis after alloHCT. In addition, eGFR <45 mL/min was associated with an increased overall mortality (HR, 1.63; P < .0001). An eGFR-based revised HCT-CI was also developed and shown to be predictive of overall survival (OS) and NRM, with predictive performance similar to the original HCT-CI. Among 46 patients on dialysis at alloHCT, the 1-year probability of OS was 20%, and that of NRM was 67%. The degree of pretransplantation renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of OS, NRM, and probability of needing dialysis after alloHCT. An eGFR-based HCT-CI is a validated index for predicting outcomes in adults with hematologic malignancies undergoing alloHCT. The outcomes of alloHCT recipients on dialysis are dismal; therefore, one should strongly weigh the significant risks of being on hemodialysis as a factor in determining alloHCT candidacy.

Feasibility of geriatric assessment before transplant conditioning regimen in older HCT recipients

Bone Marrow Transplant

2021 Mohamed Sorror

N/A

Regimen-intensity per count-recovery and hospitalization index: A new tool to assign regimen intensity for AML

Cancer Med

2020 Mohamed Sorror; Fred Appelbaum; Elihu Estey; Megan Othus; Ylinne Lynch; Pamela Becker; Jennifer Nyland; Mary-Elizabeth Percival

BACKGROUND: Low-intensity regimens have been increasingly used to treat older patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recent studies, however, suggest older patients can tolerate and potentially benefit from intensive chemotherapeutic regimens. The ability to compare the utility of varying regimen intensities in AML is hindered by the lack of a standardized definition of "regimen intensity." METHODS: We conducted a survey asking AML physicians which of 38 regimens they would consider intensive vs less-intensive. Electronic medical records of 592 patients receiving many of these regimens were used to design a model characterizing regimens as intensive vs less-intensive as identified by 75% physician consensus. Variables included frequency and length of hospitalizations, intensive care unit admissions, severe gastrointestinal toxicities, time to nadir, and recovery of neutrophil/platelet count. RESULTS: Physicians agreed at a rate of 75%-100% on the assignment of degree of intensity to the majority (n=28) of these regimens, while the level of agreement was <75% for the remaining 10 regimens (26%). Logistic regression analyses identified number and length of hospitalizations to be significantly associated with intensive regimens and count recovery with less-intensive regimens. We created the "regimen-intensity per count-recovery and hospitalization" (RICH) index with an AUC of 0.87. Independent model validation yielded an AUC of 0.75. CONCLUSIONS: We were able to generate a novel model that defines regimen intensity for many therapies used to treat AML. Results facilitate a future randomized study comparing intensive vs less-intensive regimens.

Survival of patients with newly diagnosed high-grade myeloid neoplasms who do not meet standard trial eligibility

Haematologica

2021 Pamela Becker; Mary-Elizabeth Percival; Paul Hendrie; Megan Othus; Mohamed Sorror; Elihu Estey; Anna Halpern; Roland Walter; Carole Shaw

Few patients with cancer, including those with acute myeloid leukemia and high-grade myeloid neoplasms, participate in clinical trials. Broadening standard eligibility criteria may increase clinical trial participation. In this retrospective single-center analysis, we identified 442 consecutive newly diagnosed patients from 2014 to 2016. Patients were considered eligible if they had performance status 0-2, normal renal and hepatic function, no recent solid tumor, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) ≥ 50%, and no history of congestive heart failure (CHF) or myocardial infarction (MI); ineligible patients failed to meet one or more of these criteria. We included 372 patients who received chemotherapy. Ineligible patients represented 40% of the population and had a 1-79-fold greater risk of death (95% CI 1.37, 2.33) than eligible patients. Very few patients had cardiac co-morbidities, including 2% with low EF, 4% with prior CHF, and 5% with prior MI. In multivariable analysis, ineligibility was associated with decreased survival [HR 1-44 (95% CI 1-07, 1-93)]. Allogeneic transplantation, performed in 150 patients (40%), was associated with improved survival [HR 0-66, 95% CI (0-48, 0-91)]. Therefore, standard eligibility characteristics identify a patient population with improved survival. Further treatment options are needed for patients considered ineligible for clinical trials.

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with non-myeloablative conditioning for patients with hematologic malignancies improved outcomes over two decades

Haematologica

2021 David Maloney; Noa Granot; Boglarka Gyurkocza; Rainer Storb; H. Joachim Deeg; Mohamed Sorror; Mary Flowers; George Georges; Jason Cooper; Paul Martin; Marco Mielcarek; Ann Woolfrey; Brenda Sandmaier; Bart Scott; Barry Storer; Thomas Chauncey; George McDonald

We have used a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for the past twenty years. During that period, changes in clinical practice have been aimed at reducing morbidity and mortality from infections, organ toxicity, and graft-versus-host disease. We hypothesized that improvements in clinical practice led to better transplantation outcomes over time. From 1997-2017, 1,720 patients with hematologic malignancies received low-dose total body irradiation +/- fludarabine or clofarabine before transplantation from HLA-matched sibling or unrelated donors, followed by mycophenolate mofetil and a calcineurin inhibitor ± sirolimus. We compared outcomes in three cohorts by year of transplantation: 1997 +/- 2003 (n=562), 2004 +/- 2009 (n=594), and 2010 +/- 2017 (n=564). The proportion of patients ≥60 years old increased from 27% in 1997 +/- 2003 to 56% in 2010-2017, and with scores from the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comborbidity Index of ≥3 increased from 25% in 1997 +/- 2003 to 45% in 2010 +/- 2017. Use of unrelated donors increased from 34% in 1997 +/- 2003 to 65% in 2010-2017. When outcomes from 2004 +/- 2009 and 2010-2017 were compared to 1997 +/- 2003, improvements were noted in overall survival (P=.0001 for 2004-2009 and P <.0001 for 2010-2017), profression-free survival (P=.002 for 2004-2009 and P <.0001 for 2010 +/- 2017), non-relapse mortality (P<.0001 for 2004 +/- 2009 and P <.0001 for 2010 +/- 2017), and in rates of grades 2 +/- 4 acute and chronic graft-vs.-host disease. For patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent transplantation with non-myeloablative conditioning, outcomes have improved during the past two decades. Trials reported are registered under ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00003145, NCT00003196, NCT00003954, NCT00005799, NCT00005801, NCT00005803, NCT00006251, NCT00014235, NCT00027820, NCT00031655, NCT00036738, NCT00045435, NCT00052546, NCT00060424, NCT00075478, NCT00078858, NCT00089011, NCT00104858, NCT00105001, NCT00110058, NCT00397813, NCT00793572, NCT01231412, NCT01252667, NCT01527045.

Last Modified, December 03, 2019