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Public Art and Community Dialogue Program

Land Acknowledgment

We acknowledge that Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance sit on the traditional land of the first people of Seattle, the Duwamish People past and present, and honor with gratitude the land itself and the Duwamish Tribe.

Intentional Conversations. Transformative Art.

Science goes beyond scientists. At Fred Hutch, challenging oppression and embracing inclusive and anti-racist practices are fundamental to our mission of saving lives from cancer and related diseases.

The Public Art and Community Dialogue program, led by the Fred Hutch Office of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, provides an opportunity for employees and the broader community to be in dialogue about community solidarity and our pursuit of equity in research and health care. This program will foster ongoing dialogues with marginalized and oppressed communities to inform our commitment to inclusion, and how we represent that commitment in visual form.

Diverse artists from underrepresented and marginalized communities will engage with the Hutch community of scientists and science supporters in all areas of administration in developing public art expressions for Fred Hutch banners and flags. These images will reflect the themes, emotions, expressions, history, culture, and aspirations of the affinity communities and the commitments of Fred Hutch to deepen our anti-racist and inclusive efforts in scientific excellence.

Mark Modimola

Selected Artist for the Public Artist and Community Dialogue Program

I am an African Visual Artist, born in South Africa. Originally a graphic designer, I consider myself a versatile creator, with a portfolio that explores the cadences of African identity and spirituality, often through the cultural aesthetics of portraiture and surrealism. I aim to emphasize the experience of Blackness through my work. 

I believe in sharing positive representation to and for the Black community while translating the complexity we bring to the world through vivid imagery. I am highly inspired by nature, its authenticity, unending originality and innovation. As such, my passions are tied in with Africa; its land and its people, this can be seen in my work.

Follow him on Instagram and Behance and purchase his work on INPRNT.

Cultivating a Beloved Community: A Dialogue Series

The Community Dialogue portion of this Program offers an opportunity for our organization to engage with the broader community to help guide our pursuit of equity in health care. These virtual dialogues offer a platform for panelists and community members to share stories and lived experiences, which will help inform future initiatives and guide our selected artists as they create their commissioned work. 

   

You can’t achieve equity without going to the community and engaging them in dialogue, getting their perspective and including them in future solutions and ideas.

Danté Morehead, M.P.H.
Community Health Educator, Office of Community Engagement and Outreach, Fred Hutch/University of Washington Cancer Consortium
Public Art and Community Dialogue Committee Member
 

About the Artwork

Diverse artists from underrepresented and marginalized communities will engage with the Hutch community of scientists and science supporters in all areas of administration in developing public art expressions for Fred Hutch banners and flags. These images will reflect the themes, emotions, expressions, history, culture, and aspirations of the affinity communities and the commitments of Fred Hutch to deepen our anti-racist and inclusive efforts in scientific excellence.

The calls for Black/African American and Indigenous artists have now closed. Future calls will be held for artists of other backgrounds including: Asian, Pacific Islander, Hispanic, Latinx/e, LGBTQIA+ and Jewish communities. Check back for more information later this spring. 

Solidarity Statements

Black Community Solidarity

In 2020, Fred Hutch raised our banners and flags in support of the social movement that affirms the value of Black life and resists violence and terror against them. Our commitment is expressed in our Statement in Affirmation of Black Lives. This guiding statement is also a call to action and accountability for us, as we stand and work in solidarity with our Black identifying employees and neighbors.

Racism is a public health crisis that we do not ignore in our mission to find cures. We recognize the impact of white supremacy on Black people from the foundation of our country and health systems to the present moment in which the struggle for freedom and dignity remains the paramount concern for the Black community. We desire to be in solidarity with the Black community to resist oppression, anti-Black racism in all its forms, and to honor the humanity of Black people in our scientific excellence as a central feature of our anti-racist efforts.

Indigenous Community Solidarity

In response to the guidance of the Duwamish, Fred Hutch practices the use of a Land Acknowledgment at the start of all our important meetings. This is not a rote practice, but an opportunity for us to honor the first people of this land and recognize the historical context in which we find ourselves.

The history of colonization has not ended. Further, we see the consequences of colonization on land, people, and in science. Indigenous people are underrepresented in clinical trials and other research, and in the community of scientists and care providers in the healthcare system. Indigenous people are disproportionately impacted by most of society’s ills, including institutional violence and COVID-19. We want to pursue relationship and solidarity with the land and people that resists colonial impacts and repositions us as conscientious guests and neighbors.

Related Fred Hutch News

New Fred Hutch initiative to foster inclusivity in science and health via art and dialogue

The Public Art and Community Dialogue Program will nurture connections between employees, underrepresented communities to shape the Hutch’s pursuit of scientific excellence through anti-racism, inclusion.
MARCH 1, 2022

In research and cancer care, Indigenous representation matters

Fred Hutch, UW researchers work to reduce risk and inequities and improve access to care, resources for Indigenous communities and patients.
DECEMBER 6, 2021
 

Community engagement ensures equitable inclusion in vaccine trials

New study from COVID-19 Prevention Network demonstrates impacts of engaging Black, Indigenous, people of color communities.
OCTOBER 19, 2021
 

Cures Start Here

At Fred Hutch, interdisciplinary teams conduct exceptional, high-impact science to achieve our vision: the elimination of cancer and related diseases as causes of human suffering and death through prevention and curative treatments accessible to all patients.

We opened our doors in 1975 with a vision of developing bone marrow transplantation as a cure for patients with leukemia, and we succeeded: Blood cancers that were a death sentence 50 years ago are now curable thanks to this procedure. To this day, our teams pursue innovative bench-to-bedside research on many types of cancer; HIV/AIDS, COVID-19 and other infectious diseases; genetic diseases; and autoimmune diseases. And our research on fundamental biology will provide the foundation for the next lifesaving insights.

Questions?

Last Modified, May 19, 2022