Fred Hutch, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, and UW Medicine Complete Restructure of Partnership

Learn More

Sarcoma

Sarcomas are a diverse group of cancers that form in bones and soft tissues like muscles, joints, tendons and fat. More than 70 subtypes exist, many of them quite rare.

At Fred Hutch, we’re studying how sarcomas develop, how they evade the body’s defenses and how to trigger the immune system to fight them.
 

Researchers and Patient Treatments

Dr. Warren Phipps

Our Sarcoma Researchers

Our interdisciplinary scientists and clinicians work together to prevent, diagnose and treat sarcoma as well as other cancers and diseases.

MEET OUR FACULTY
photo of sarcoma survivor with her family

Patient Treatment & Care

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, our clinical care partner, gives patients access to the comprehensive, world-class treatments developed at Fred Hutch.

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT

Selected Sarcoma Clinical Trials

Clinical research is an essential part of the scientific process that leads to new treatments and better care. Clinical trials can also be a way for patients to get early access to new cutting-edge new therapies. Our clinical research teams are running clinical studies on various kinds of sarcoma.

Clear Cell Sarcoma

Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) tumors occur most often in the arms, legs, feet and hands. But, CCS can grow throughout the torso, including the stomach and intestines. Sarcomas are rare cancers and CCS is a rare type of sarcoma, making up 1 percent of sarcoma cases. It is most often found in teens and young adults in their 20s.

CCS Clinical Trial

Ewing Sarcoma

Ewing sarcoma is a rare type of cancer that occurs in bones or in the soft tissue around the bones. Ewing sarcoma most often begins in the leg bones and in the pelvis, but it can occur in any bone. It usually affects people from the ages of 10 to 20 and has a high rate of being cured.

Ewing's Clinical Trials

Metastatic Sarcoma

Sarcoma cancers start in soft tissues like fat, muscle, nerves, fibrous tissues, blood vessels or deep skin tissues. They can be found anywhere in the body, but most of them start in the arms or legs. Metastatic means the sarcoma has spread to parts of the body far away from where the sarcoma started. The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor.

Metastatic Clinical Trials

Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Soft tissue sarcoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the soft tissues of the body. Soft tissues of the body connect, support, and surround other body parts and organs. Soft tissue sarcomas can form almost anywhere in the body, including the head, neck, and trunk, but are most common in the arms, legs, abdomen and retroperitoneum.

Soft Tissue Clinical Trials

Synovial Sarcoma

Synovial sarcoma is a rare and aggressive soft tissue sarcoma. It can come from different types of soft tissue, such as muscle or ligaments. It is often found in the arm, leg, or foot, and near joints such as the wrist or ankle. It can also form in soft tissues in the lung or abdomen. Synovial sarcoma may also be called malignant synovioma.

Synovial Clinical Trials

See all Sarcoma Clinical Trials

Immunotherapies

Targeted Drug Treatment

Immunotherapies

We’re world leaders in harnessing the immune system to attack cancer. A prime example is T-cell therapy, which deploys a specialized type of immune cell, the T cell. Hutch scientists are reprogramming patients’ own T cells to better recognize and target telltale markers on sarcomas. We run clinical trials that are combining radiation treatment with these T-cell therapies. And we test drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, which take the brakes off a patient’s immune system so it mounts a better response against sarcomas.

Sarcoma Research

Sarcoma research at Fred Hutch covers every aspect of the disease’s biology and treatment in children and adults. We study how sarcomas develop, how they respond to various therapies and how we can enhance the immune response against them.

Immunotherapies

We’re world leaders in harnessing the immune system to attack cancer. A prime example is T-cell therapy, which deploys a specialized type of immune cell, the T cell. Our scientists are reprogramming patients’ own T cells to better recognize and target telltale markers on sarcomas. We run clinical trials that are combining radiation treatment with these T-cell therapies. And we test drugs called checkpoint inhibitors, which take the brakes off a patient’s immune system so it mounts a better response against sarcomas.

Targeted Drug Therapies

We’re studying new drugs that target substances on or in sarcoma cells and disrupt their ability to grow and spread.

Latest Sarcoma News

SEE ALL SARCOMA NEWS
Solid tumors use a type of T cell as a shield against immune attack Discovery in head and neck cancers may open door for targeted immune-boosting drugs May 11, 2022
Global collaborators at the Heart of the Hutch Advancing science to address the burden of cancer in low- and middle-income countries June 16, 2021
Can a tumor that acts like a microbe help us develop better cancer therapies? Understanding the genetics underlying spontaneous regression of an infectious tumor in Tasmanian devils could point us toward new treatment targets August 6, 2020
CRISPR-based tool solves genetic mystery 80 million years in the making Certain DNA sequences haven’t evolved since humans and mice diverged. But why? January 7, 2020