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Hutch News

Stories tagged 'Public Health Sciences'

Good News at Fred Hutch

Celebrating faculty and staff achievements

Oct. 19, 2017

Dr. Ruth Etzioni, a Fred Hutch biostatistician, has received a five-year National Institutes of Health grant to advance the science of cancer surveillance by developing, validating and deploying a scalable, automated approach for identifying cancer recurrence.

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Science without borders

At Fred Hutch and other U.S. research centers, a global village works to cure cancer and other diseases

Oct. 16, 2017 | By Mary Engel / Fred Hutch Research Center

Fred Hutch, like other major U.S. cancer research centers, attracts top scientists from around the world working to cure cancer, HIV and other diseases

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Good News at Fred Hutch

Celebrating faculty and staff achievements

Oct. 12, 2017

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Good News at Fred Hutch

Celebrating faculty and staff achievements

Oct. 5, 2017

Thanks to robust community support, Fred Hutch vanity plates are now available. For every set of plates sold, the Hutch receives $28 to support its lifesaving, innovative science.

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The path to precision screening for cancer

For now, early detection of breast and prostate cancer means mammograms and PSAs, but a more tailored approach is on the horizon

Sept. 29, 2017 | By Diane Mapes / Fred Hutch News Service

For now, screening for breast and prostate cancer involves mammograms, MRIs and PSAs, the best evidence-based tools available at this moment in time. But it won’t be this way forever. Fred Hutch researchers weigh in on where we are on the path to precision prevention.

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Childhood cancer survivors pay more for health care, more likely to be denied insurance coverage

Adult survivors of childhood cancer suffer from ‘financial toxicity’ decades later, a study conducted at the dawn of the Affordable Care Act found

Sept. 26, 2017 | By Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

Before the Affordable Care Act's rollout, adult survivors of childhood cancer were more likely to be denied health care coverage than those without a history of cancer, paid more out-of-pocket and were more likely to borrow money to pay their medical bills, a new study has found.

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