Clinical Trial Detail

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trial Detail

Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Complete title: A Phase III Study for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) using Arsenic Trioxide and All-Trans Retinoic Acid

Research Study Number AAML1331
 
Principal Investigator Todd Cooper
 
Phase III

Research Study Description

This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.

Eligibility Criteria (must meet the following to participate in this study)

** For Eligibility information, please click on the "Look up trial at NIH" link above. **

Other eligibility criteria may apply.

Research Study Number AAML1331
 
Contact Stacy Garcia
 
Telephone 206/884-2307
 
E-mail
 

Keywords: Leukemia, Acute Myeloid (AML); Leukemia, Promyelocytic, Acute (APL); Hematologic Malignancies; Leukemia; Pediatric Cancers, Miscellaneous; Leukemia, Myeloid

Disclaimer: We update this information regularly. However, what you read today may not be completely up to date.

Please remember:

  • Talk to your health care providers first before making decisions about your health care.
  • Whether you are eligible for a research study depends on many things. There are specific requirements to be in research studies. These requirements are different for each study.

Subscribe to an RSS feed of all trials