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Stories tagged 'Joseph Unger'

Finasteride can reduce prostate cancer risk long term

Fred Hutch study taps big data to tease out extended cancer-prevention benefit of drug used for enlarged prostate, hair loss

March 21, 2018 | By Diane Mapes / Fred Hutch News Service

Fred Hutch public health researcher Dr. Joe Unger used an innovative trial design to confirm finasteride, a drug used to treat enlarged prostate or hair loss in men, has a long-term protective effect against prostate cancer.

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Acupuncture can curb treatment-related joint pain in breast cancer patients

Large, randomized trial shows integrative approach relieves common side effect of estrogen-suppressing drug

Dec. 7, 2017 | By Diane Mapes / Fred Hutch News Service

Results from a large multicenter trial released Thursday at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium offer good news to early stage breast cancer patients dealing with painful side effects from powerful estrogen-squelching drugs known as aromatase inhibitors.

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Good News at Fred Hutch

Celebrating faculty and staff achievements

Sept. 2, 2016

Global Oncology wins NCI grant; 1100 Eastlake Building honored; Bish Paul pens essay in Science; Dr. Joseph Unger leads finasteride study.

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In defense of the negative result

Large cancer clinical trials that ‘fail’ carry just as much scientific oomph as positive findings, new study shows

March 10, 2016 | By Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

Researchers have found a positive side to negative results in cancer clinical trials -- among all the publications resulting from large cancer clinical trials, negative trials have just as much scientific impact as positive findings.

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Another health disparity: clinical trials

Low-income cancer patients are less likely to take part in clinical trials for new treatments, study shows

Oct. 15, 2015 | By Mary Engel / Fred Hutch News Service

Cancer patients who live on less than $50,000 a year take part in clinical trials at a rate one-third lower than those who make more annually, according to a study published Thursday in JAMA Oncology.

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