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Stories tagged 'human microbiome'

25 powerful years of HIV research

Longstanding Mombasa Cohort helps answer questions about HIV risk and transmission

Feb. 26, 2018 | By Sabrina Richards / Fred Hutch News Service

For 25 years, Fred Hutch virologist Dr. Julie Overbaugh has helped lead the Mombasa Cohort, a unique group of women at high risk for HIV transmission.

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Microbiome research refines HIV risk for women

For the first time, seven species of vaginal bacteria linked to higher HIV susceptibility

Jan. 25, 2018 | By Sabin Russell / Fred Hutch News Service

Drawing from data collected for years by AIDS researchers in six African nations, scientists have pinpointed seven bacterial species whose presence in high concentrations may significantly increase the risk of HIV infection in women.

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Fred Hutch community mourns Dr. Robert W. Day

As president and director for 16 years, Day led Fred Hutch's 'momentous' move to South Lake Union

Jan. 8, 2018 | By Sabin Russell / Fred Hutch News Service

Fred Hutch's longest-serving president and director, Dr. Robert Day brought into being its South Lake Union campus in the 1990s.

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Enlisting the microbiome in the quest for an AIDS vaccine

We now know that microbial communities, especially in our guts, profoundly affect immune response

Nov. 22, 2017 | By Sabin Russell / Fred Hutch News Service

Scientists at Fred Hutch are studying how the microbiome alters the immune system’s response to vaccines. Their work is already providing new insights on interactions between microbes in the body and the immune system that have implications for improving many types of vaccines.

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Good News at Fred Hutch

Celebrating faculty and staff achievements

June 22, 2017

A new algorithm created by Dr. Philip Bradley and colleagues could aid the development of tools to decode T-cell receptor sequences and, ultimately, improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancers, reported this week in Nature.

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Antimicrobial stewardship preserves a ‘shared resource’

Gains in cancer survival at risk due to surge in multi-drug resistant superbugs

May 4, 2017 | By Mary Engel / Fred Hutch News Service

Antibiotics and other antimicrobials are unique among medications, a “shared resource” that we need to preserve, much as we steward our environment and natural resources, says Fred Hutch clinician-infectious disease researcher Dr. Catherine Liu. Overuse or misuse can lead to drug-resistant bugs that can then spread to new hosts and in some cases even spread their resistance genes to different microorganisms, posing a risk to society at large.

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