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Stories tagged 'ASH 2016'

Promising results in trial of engineered T cells in high-risk leukemia

High response rates to experimental immunotherapy in patients with treatment-resistant chronic lymphocytic leukemia

July 17, 2017 | By Susan Keown / Fred Hutch News Service

Most patients with recurrent chronic lymphocytic leukemia who were enrolled in a small, early- phase trial saw their advanced tumors shrink or even disappear after an infusion of genetically engineered immune cells. Dr. Cameron Turtle, one of the study’s leaders, presented the results on Saturday at the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Diego.

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What's new in blood diseases

Four things to watch from the 2016 annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology

Dec. 20, 2016 | By Susan Keown / Fred Hutch News Service

For a few days earlier this month, a small city’s-worth of health professionals and researchers from nations across the globe converged for the world’s biggest conference in hematology. Fred Hutch News Service was on the ground at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology Dec. 3-6 in San Diego, California. From immunotherapy for advanced blood cancers to new approaches to treating sickle cell disease, here’s our top four things to watch from the meeting.

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The quest to better understand the deadliest childhood leukemia

Oncologists are beginning to leverage unique genomic characteristics of pediatric AML to improve treatment and prognosis

Dec. 7, 2016 | By Sabrina Richards / Fred Hutch News Service

Acute myeloid leukemia is the deadliest leukemia among children. Only 60 percent of patients will achieve long-term remission. But scientists see change on the horizon.

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Immunotherapy shows promise in preventing leukemia relapse

Group of 12 high-risk patients who received engineered T cells after bone marrow transplant still in remission after more than two years

Dec. 5, 2016 | By Susan Keown / Fred Hutch News Service

For patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia, relapse after bone marrow transplant signals a low chance of survival. But results from a small trial of genetically engineered immune cells show promise for keeping these patients out of danger: Of the 12 AML patients who received this experimental T-cell therapy after a transplant put their disease in remission, all are still in remission after a median follow-up of more than two years.

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'Back to normal life'

Sorting stem cells before transplant helps lower the risk of graft-vs.-host disease, researcher reports

Dec. 5, 2016 | By Bill Briggs / Fred Hutch News Service

Patients in a clinical trial, including Dr. Curtis Mack, had lower rates of graft-vs.-host disease when researchers filtered stem cells before transplant, scientists reported Monday.

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Three's a charm in a triple-drug combination for transplant patients

A drug with a storied past offers a new edge against an old foe

Dec. 4, 2016 | By Sabin Russell / Fred Hutch News Service

Discovered nearly 45 years ago in the volcanic soils of fabled Easter Island in the Pacific, a drug first thought of as an antifungal agent has found a new purpose by boosting the survival of leukemia patients after blood stem cell transplants. In a clinical trial conducted by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the addition of a third drug, sirolimus, to a standard two-drug regimen effectively cut in half the incidence of acute graft-vs.-host disease, or GVHD, a common and dangerous complication of these lifesaving procedures.

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