Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division

Human Herpesviruses

VIDD scientists and affiliates study all of the human herpesviruses (CMV, EBV, HHV-6, HHV-8, HSV-1, HSV-2 and VZV) with the collective aim of understanding how to mitigate viral infection outcomes. Herpesvirus infections such as CMV are of special concern in the immunocompromised patient population where they can cause severe morbidity and in some cases promote the development of certain human cancers. Our internationally renowned researchers are exploring novel and diverse approaches to reduce the impact of these viruses on patients. VIDD, with UW partners, has a world renowned program to study the natural history and host-pathogen interactions in genital herpes and neonatal herpes. VIDD scientists have conducted pioneering research to identify prevention and therapeutic strategies and have developed novel techniques to diagnose infections in infants and adults.

Faculty

Senior Staff Scientist, Jerome Lab, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division
Research interests include targeting latent viral genomes for mutagenesis and disruption of viral pathogenesis and infection using engineered homing endonucleases.
Head, Infectious Disease Sciences Program, VIDD Research Interests
Professor, Medicine, University of Washington
Attending Physician, SCCA Infectious Disease Consulting Service, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Infections in the immunocompromised host, especially diagnosis, prevention and treatment of CMV, VZV, BK virus, adenovirus, and respiratory virus infections. Research includes understanding the genetic basis of infeciton complications, genome and gene expression studies.
Phone: (206) 667-4898
Fax: (206) 667-4411
Director, UCI/Hutchinson Center Cancer Alliance, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Epidemiology, natural history, and treatment of human herpesvirus 8 infection and treatment of Epstein Barr Virus-associated lymphomas. HIV-related cance and infections as a complication of cancer care. Cancer epidemiology, pathobiology, treatment and training in resource-limited settings.
Phone: (206) 667-4600
Fax: (206) 667-1965
Host-pathogen co-evolution, T-cell and B-cell immunodominance and the effects of immunological history.
Professor, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Head, Virology Division, University of Washington
Director, Molecular Virology Laboratory, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Clinically important persistent and latent viral infections; curative therapies for latent viral infections ;diagnosis of disease caused by herpesviruses, enterovirus, JC and BK viruses, parvovirus B19, and hepatitis viruses
Phone: (206) 667-6793
Fax: (206) 667-6179
Research Assistant Professor, Global Health, University of Washington
Graduate Faculty, Global Health, University of Washington
Roles of regulatory T cells in modulating anti-viral immunity; anti-viral immunity; vaccine development
Research Associate Professor, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Graduate Faculty, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Statistical support to clinical research on HSV1 and HSV2 and other herpesvirus infections; Clinical association between herpes and HIV; statistical methods work in areas such as misclassification in time-to-event outcomes, laboratory assay validation, and methods for quantifying and examining risk factors for viral shedding
Phone: (206) 520-4316
Fax: (206) 520-4371
Professor, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Graduate Faculty, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Laboratory diagnosis of viral disease in humans. Natural history and epidemiology of genital herpes and neonatal herpes.
Fax: (206) 667-6366
Assistant Member, Clinical Research Division
Assistant Professor, Medicine, University of Washington
Study Physician, UW Virology Research Clinic, University of Washington
Interest in describing the quantitative and dynamical features of human pathogens and immune responses. Most of work to-date is on the pathogenesis of HSV-2 infection but also interested in applying models to optimize viral eradication startegies, and to use models to capture kinetic features of the human microbiome.
Professor, Medicine, Laboratory Medicine, and Epidemiology, University of Washington
Graduate Faculty, Medicine, Laboratory Medicine, and Epidemiology, University of Washington
Attending Physician, SCCA Infectious Disease Consulting Service, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance
Epidemiology, natural history, therapy, and prevention of HSV and other herpesvirus infections; interactions between HSV and HIV Vaccines and clinical trials
Phone: (206) 520-4340