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Pregnancy Outcome and Safety of Interrupting Therapy for Women With Endocrine Responsive Breast Cancer (POSITIVE)

Complete title: A Study Evaluating the Pregnancy Outcomes and Safety of Interrupting Endocrine Therapy for Young Women with Endocrine Responsive Breast Cancer who Desire Pregnancy

Research Study Number A221405
Principal Investigator Rachel Yung
Phase NA

Research Study Description

The best available evidence suggests that pregnancy after breast cancer does not increase a woman's risk of developing a recurrence from her breast cancer. In particular, the most recent data suggest that this is the case also in women with a hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. There is also no indication of increased risk for delivery complications or for the newborn. The aim of the study is to investigate if temporary interruption of endocrine therapy, with the goal to permit pregnancy, is associated with a higher risk of breast cancer recurrence.The study aims also to evaluate different specific indicators related to fertility, pregnancy and breast cancer biology in young women. A psycho-oncological companion study on fertility concerns, psychological well-being and decisional conflicts will be conducted in interested Centers.

Eligibility Criteria (must meet the following to participate in this study)

** For Eligibility information, please click on the "Look up trial at NIH" link above. **

Other eligibility criteria may apply.

Research Study Number A221405
Contact Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Intake Office
Telephone 800-804-8824 / 206-606-1024

Keywords: Breast Cancer; Solid Tumors

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