Science Spotlight launches

Science Spotlight

Science Spotlight launches

Oct. 17, 2011

Dusty Miller, Faculty Mentor

"As the number of Hutch faculty and research staff grows, it becomes increasingly challenging to promote awareness of this wealth of research and to stimulate collaborations across our divisions. I believe we have an opportunity to achieve even greater research advances through collaboration and to further engage our strong administrative staff by providing more opportunities to become familiar with the Center’s science."

-Larry Corey

In response to this challenge, five postdocs have been recruited to summarize 10 Center-authored publications each month that they find particularly interesting. These publications are drawn from all five Divisions, the intent being to provide two summaries for papers from each Division every month. There will be a rotating postdoc Editor-in-Chief, who for this month is Matt Arnegard from Human Biology.

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To estimate the effort required, library staff members Allysha Eyler and Ann Marie Clark compiled a publication list for 2010, based on authorship, that documents in an impressive volume of research:

Center Publications for 2010

Basic Sciences: 76

Clinical Research: 290

Human Biology: 82

Public Health Sciences: 423

Vaccine and Infectious Diseases: 106

Given the large number of publications each month, the postdocs can summarize only a small fraction of the publications, and will certainly miss many worthy reports. We will try to exclude publications already given special coverage in Center News Weekly, to focus on additional exciting research. Links to all of the publications from the five Divisions, thanks to the efforts of the library staff, will be provided as an additional resource. Science Spotlight is targeted to Center employees, but eventually will be made available to the public as well.

We hope you enjoy Science Spotlight and find it a useful resource. Feel free to send comments and questions. This is a new undertaking for us, which we hope will improve with time.

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