The Hutch Award

The Hutch Award

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Mickey Mantle
Sandy Koufax
Carl Yastrzemski
Pete Rose
Al Kaline
Tony Conigliaro
Joe Torre
Bobby Tolan
John Hiller
Danny Thompson
Gary Nolan
Tommy John
Willie McCovey
Willie Stargell
Lou Brock
George Brett
Johnny Bench
Andre Thornton
Ray Knight
Don Robinson
Rick Reuschel
Dennis Leonard
Paul Molitor
Ron Oester
Dave Dravecky
Sid Bream
Bill Wegman
Carney Lansford
John Olerud
Andre Dawson
Jim Abbott
Omar Vizquel
Eric Davis
David Cone
Sean Casey
Jason Giambi
Curt Schilling
Tim Salmon
Jamie Moyer
Trevor Hoffman
Craig Biggio
Mark Loretta
Mike Sweeney
Jon Lester
Mark Teahen
Tim Hudson
Billy Butler
Barry Zito
Raul Ibanez
Alex Gordon
Adam Wainwright
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Mickey Mantle

Mickey Mantle was the first recipient of the Hutch Award in 1965.

Mantle played center field and first base for the New York Yankees. During his 18-year career, Mantle won the Triple Crown in 1956 (leading all baseball players in batting average, home runs and runs batted in), was a 16-time All-Star, and appeared in 12 World Series, with the Yankees winning seven.

Photo by AP

Sandy Koufax

Sandy Koufax won the Hutch Award in 1966.

Koufax is regarded as one of the best left-handers to ever take the mound. He played for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers for 12 years, and won the Cy Young Award three times and was named National League Most Valuable Player once. He played in four World Series, helping the Dodgers win three of them. Koufax was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1972.

Photo by AP

Carl Yastrzemski

Carl Yastrzemski won the Hutch Award in 1967.

Yastrzemski, nicknamed "Yaz," had a long 23-year career playing for the Boston Red Sox as a left fielder and first baseman. Yastrzemski was an All-Star 18 times, a six-time Golden Glove winner, and the American Leauge's Most Valuable Player in 1967. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Photo by Julian C. Wilson / AP

Pete Rose

Pete Rose won the Hutch Award in 1968.

Nicknamed "Charlie Hustle," Rose played 24 years for the Cincinnati Reds, Philadelphia Phillies and Montreal Expos. Rose is Major League Baseball's all-time hits leader with 4,256. He was named Rookie of the Year in 1963, was the National League's MVP in 1973, and was an All-Star 17 times.

Photo by Ray Stubblebine / AP

Al Kaline

Al Kaline won the Hutch Award in 1969.

Kaline played his entire 22-year career with the Detroit Tigers, and was known as "Mr. Tiger." He was a 15-time All-Star, and was inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame in 1980.

Photo by AP

Tony Conigliaro

Tony Conigliaro won the Hutch Award in 1970.

Conigliaro played for the Boston Red Sox and California Angels during is 8-year career. In 1967, Conigliaro was hit in the face by a pitch, and suffered severe eye damage. He came back from the injury, but his career was not the same.

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Joe Torre

Joe Torre won the Hutch Award in 1971.

Torre played for the Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets during his 18-year career. Torre was a 9-time All-Star and was National League MVP in 1971.

Torre was also a manager for several teams, most notably the New York Yankees, who won four World Series titles under his leadership. Torre was inducted into the Hall of Fame as a manager in 2014.

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Bobby Tolan

Bobby Tolan won the Hutch Award in 1972.

Tolan played 13 years for several teams, including the St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres. 

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John Hiller

John Hiller won the Hutch Award in 1973.

Hiller, a pitcher, played his entire 15-year career with the Detroit Tigers. He was a member of the 1968 Tigers team the won the World Series.

Hiller recorded 38 saves in 1973, just two years after he suffered a heart attack. That was a Major League record that stood until 1983.

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Danny Thompson

Danny Thompson won the Hutch Award in 1974.

Thompson was in infielder for the Minnesota Twins and Texas Rangers during his seven years in Major League Baseball. 

Thompson was diagnosed with granulocytic leukemia in 1973, but continued playing for four more seasons. He led all American League shortstops in 1975 with a .275 batting average, and he played 98 games in the 1976 season. He passed away shortly after the season ended on December 10, 1976.

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Gary Nolan

Gary Nolan won the Hutch Award in 1975.

Nolan was a hard throwing right-handed pitcher for the Cincinnati Reds most of his 10-year career. He was a member of the Reds squads that won the World Series in 1975 and 1976.

Photo by: Diamond Images / Getty Images

Tommy John

Tommy John won the Hutch Award in 1976.

The southpaw pitcher played an amazing 26 years for six teams, including the New York Yankees (twice), California Angels and Los Angeles Dodgers. He amassed 288 wins, ranking him No. 7 among left-handed pitchers in Major League history.

In 1974, John suffered an injury that ultimately was treated by an operation that replaced the ligament in the elbow of his throwing arm with a tendon from his right forearm. The procedure is now known as Tommy John surgery.

Photo by AP

Willie McCovey

Willie McCovey won the Hutch Award in 1977.

McCovey played 22 years, mostly for the San Francisco Giants. He was baseball's Rookie of the Year in 1959, the National League MVP in 1969, and a 6-time All-Star. 

McCovey had several nicknames, including "Bic Mac" and "Stretch." Pitcher Bob Gibson called the power hitter something else: "the scariest hitter in baseball." He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1986.

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Willie Stargell

Willie Stargell won the Hutch Award in 1978.

During his 21-year career, Stargell was an All-Star seven times and the National League MVP in 1979. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates during successful World Series campaigns in 1971 and 1979, and was named World Series MVP in '79 after putting up a .400 batting average with 12 hits, including seven extra-base hits including three homeruns.

Stargell was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1988. He passed away on April 9, 2001.

Photo by AP

Lou Brock

Lou Brock won the Hutch Award in 1979.

Brock played most of his 19-year career with the St. Louis Cardinals. He racked up more than 3,000 hits, and was one of the most prolific base stealers to ever play the game. Brock stole 938 bases in total, and was the all-time stolen base leader until 1991.

Brock was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1985.

Photo by Louis Requena / MLB Photos via Getty Images

George Brett

George Brett won the Hutch Award in 1980.

Brett played for the Kansas City Royals his entire career. He is one of four baseball players in MLB history to accumulate 3,000 hits, 300 home runs and a .300 batting average. Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Stan Musial are the other baseball icons to perform that feat.

Brett was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1999.

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Johnny Bench

Johnny Bench won the Hutch Award in 1981.

Bench was Rookie of the Year in 1968 and National League MVP in 1970 and 1972. He played his entire 17-year career for the Cincinnati Reds. He helped the Reds to World Series titles in 1975 and 1976, and was named World Series MVP in '76.

Bench was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1989.

Photo by AP

Andre Thornton

Andre Thornton won the Hutch Award in 1982.

Thornton played for the Chicago Cubs, Montreal Expos and Cleveland Indians during his 14-year career. He received the Roberto Clemente Award in 1979.

The 2-time All-Star was inducted into the Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame in 2007.

Photo by Paul Benoit / AP

Ray Knight

Ray Knight won the Hutch Award in 1983.

Knight was the MVP of the 1986 World Series after he helped the New York Mets beat the Boston Red Sox in seven games.

He played for five teams (also the Cincinnati Reds, Houston Astros, Detroit Tigers and Baltimore Orioles) over his 13-year playing career, and now is a sports analyst who covers the Washington Nationals.

Photo by Ray Stubblebine / AP

Don Robinson

Don Robinson won the Hutch Award in 1984.

Nicknamed "The Caveman," Robinson was a pitcher who played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, San Francisco Giants, California Angels and Philadelphia Phillies over his 15-year career. 

Robinson was one of the better hitting pitchers of his era. He won the Silver Slugger Award in 1982, 1989 and 1990.

Photo by George Gojkovich / Getty Images

Rick Reuschel

Rick Reuschel won the Hutch Award in 1985.

Reuschel played for the Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates and New York Yankees during his 19-year career. The right-hander won a Gold Glove award in 1987, and was a 3-time All-Star.

 

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Dennis Leonard

Dennis Leonard won the Hutch Award in 1986.

Leonard played his 12-year career with the Kansas City Royals. The right-handed pitcher was a 20-game winner in 1977, 1978 and 1980.

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Paul Molitor

Paul Molitor won the Hutch Award in 1987.

Molitor, known as "The Ignitor," was a 7-time All-Star. He played 15 years with the Milwaukee Brewers, and finished out his career with the Toronto Blue Jays and Minnesota Twins.

Molitor racked up 3,319 total hits, and earned World Series MVP honors in 1993 after hitting .500 and helping the Blue Jays earn the world title.

Molitor was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2004.

 

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Ron Oester

Ron Oester won the Hutch Award in 1988.

Oester was a second baseman and shortstop for the Cincinnati Reds, and helped the Reds win the 1990 World Series over the Oakland Athletics.

Photo by Jonathan Daniel /Allsport via Getty Images

Dave Dravecky

Dave Dravecky won the Hutch Award in 1989.

Dravecky played for the San Diego Padres and San Francisco Giants during his 8-year career.

In 1998, a desmoid tumor was found his Dravecky's throwing arm. He underwent surgery and returned to the mound in 1999. That year, while pitching against the Montreal Expos, Dravecky's humerus bone snapped while delivering a pitch. In 1991, his left arm and shoulder were amputated.

Following his baseball career, Dravecky wrote two books and became a motivational speaker.

Photo by Otto Greule Jr. / Allsport via Getty Images

Sid Bream

Sid Bream won the Hutch Award in 1990.

Bream played for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Pittsburgh Pirates, Atlanta Braves and Houston Astros during his 12-year career.

Photo by Rusty Kennedy / AP

Bill Wegman

Bill Wegman won the Hutch Award in 1991.

Wegman pitched for the Milwaukee Brewers for 11 years. He won 15 games in 1991, a career high, with a 2.84 earned run average.

Otto Greule / Allsport via Getty Images

Carney Lansford

Carney Lansford won the Hutch Award in 1992.

Lansford played for the California Angels, Boston Red Sox and Oakland Athletics during his 15-year career.

He helped the A's win the 1989 World Series with a .438 batting average during the four-game sweep of the San Francisco Giants.

Photo by Larry Goren/Four Seam Images via AP Images

John Olerud

John Olerud won the Hutch Award in 1993.

During his 17-year career, Olerud played for five teams and earned three Golden Glove awards and two All-Star nods.

He helped the Toronto Blue Jays win back-to-back World Series titles in 1992 and 1993, and he played a key role in 2001 as the Seattle Mariners won a remarkable 116 games.

Mark J. Terrill / AP

Andre Dawson

Andre Dawson won the Hutch Award in 1994.

Nicknamed "The Hawk," Dawson's career spanned 21 years with the Montreal Expos, Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox and Florida Marlins.

Dawson was Rookie of the Year in 1997, was an 8-time All-Star, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2010.

Photo by Stephen Dunn / Allsport via Getty Images

Jim Abbott

Jim Abbott won the Hutch Award in 1995.

Abbott was a successful pitcher despite being born without a right hand. He played for the California Angels, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox and Milwaukee Brewers during his 10-year career.

Abbott earned a career-best 18 wins in 1991 while pitching for the Angels.

Photo by Tim de Frisco / Allsport via Getty Images

Omar Vizquel

Omar Vizquel won the Hutch Award in 1996.

Known as "Little O," Vizquel won 11 Golden Gloves during his 24-year career, including nine straight while playing for the Seattle Mariners and Cleveland Indians.

Vizquel was one of the best fielding shortstops to have played, and went 95 consecutive games without an error.

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Eric Davis

Eric Davis won the Hutch Award in 1997.

Davis played 17 years with the Cincinnati Reds (twice), Los Angeles Dodgers, Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, St. Louis Cardinals and San Francisco Giants.

In 1987, Davis was became the first player to ever hit for 30 home runs and steal 50 bases.

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David Cone

David Cone won the Hutch Award in 1998.

The right-hander earned 194 wins during a 17-year career with the Kansas City Royals (twice), New York Mets (twice), Toronto Blue Jays (twice), New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox.

Cone won the 1994 Cy Young Award, pitched a perfect game in 1999, and was a member of five World Series championship teams.

Photo by John Bazemore / AP

Sean Casey

Sean Casey won the Hutch Award in 1999.

Over his 12-year playing career, Casey (nicknamed "The Mayor") was a member of the Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds, Pittsburgh Pirates, Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox.

Photo by David Kohl / AP

Jason Giambi

Jason Giambi won the Hutch Award in 2000.

Giambi played for the Oakland Athletics (twice), New York Yankees, Colorado Rockies and Cleveland Indians over his 20-year career.

The slugger was the American League's Most Valuable Player in 1999, and he earned five All-Star nods.

Photo by Ben Margot / AP

Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling won the Hutch Award in 2001.

Schilling racked up 216 wins during his 20-year career that included time on several rosters: Baltimore Orioles, Houston Astros, Philadelphia Phillies, Arizona Diamondbacks and Boston Red Sox.

Schilling was the World Series MVP in 2001 as his Diamondbacks topped the New York Yankees. He was also a member of the Boston Red Sox squads that won the 2004 and 2007 World Series. 

Lenny Ignelzi / AP

Tim Salmon

Tim Salmon won the Hutch Award in 2002.

Salmon played his entire 14-year career with the California/Anaheim/Los Angeles Angels. He slammed 299 home runs and 1,016 runs batted in during that time.

Salmon was Rookie of the Year in 1993, and helped the Angels win the 2002 World Series by hitting .346, including two home runs.

Photo by Ben Margot / AP

Jamie Moyer

Jamie Moyer won the Hutch Award in 2003.

Moyer played for eight teams over his 25-year career. A master of off-speed pitches, he is the oldest player in MLB history to win a game and record an RBI.

Known for his philanthropic and community-service work, Moyer also won the 2003 Roberto Clemente Award, the 2003 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award and the 2004 Branch Rickey Award. 

Photo by Dan Levine / AFP via Getty Images

Trevor Hoffman

Trevor Hoffman won the Hutch Award in 2004.

Over an 18-year career, Hoffman was a fierce closer who earned 601 saves, including a league-best 53 in 1998 and 46 in 2006. He is No. 2 on the all-time saves list behind the great Mariano Rivera.

Photo By Andy Lyons / Getty Images

Craig Biggio

Craig Biggio won the Hutch Award in 2005.

Biggio played 20 years with the Houston Astros where he racked up 3,060 hits, including 668 doubles and 291 home runs.

The 7-time All-Star was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2015.

Photo by David J. Phillip / AP

Mark Loretta

Mark Loretta won the Hutch Award in 2006.

Loretta played professionally for 15 years as an infielder for the Milwaukee Brewers, Houston Astros (twice), San Diego Padres, Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers.

Photo by Bill Kostroun / AP

Mike Sweeney

Mike Sweeney won the Hutch Award in 2007.

Sweeney played most of his 16-year career with the Kansas City Royals. He was a 5-time All-Star.

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Jon Lester

Jon Lester won the Hutch Award in 2008.

Lester helped the Boston Red Sox win the 2007 and 2013 World Series. In those contests, he is 3-0 with an earned run average of 0.43 and 18 strikeouts.

In 2006, Lester was diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphona. In the off-season, he was successfully treated with chemotherapy at Fred Hutch.

In 2015 Lester will be pitching for the Chicago Cubs.

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Mark Teahen

Mark Teahen won the Hutch Award in 2009.

Teahen spent his 7-year career playing with the Kansas City Royals, Chicago White Sox and Toronto Blue Jays.

Photo by Ed Zurga / AP

Tim Hudson

Tim Hudson won the Hutch Award in 2010.

Hudson has played for the Oakland Athletics, Atlanta Braves and San Francisco Giants during his 16-year career. He was a member of the 2014 World Series champion Giants.

Through the 2014 season, Hudson has 214 career wins, including a career-high 20 wins in 2000, and a lifetime winning percentage of .633.

Photo by Jared Wickerham / Getty Images

Billy Butler

Billy Butler won the Hutch Award in 2011.

Butler played for the Kansas City Royals from 2007-2014. In 2015, he'll be a member of the Oakland Athletics.

Photo by Charlie Riedel / AP

Barry Zito

Barry Zito won the Hutch Award in 2012.

Zito's 14-year career has kept him grounded in the Bay Area. He played for Oakland from 2000-2006 and the San Francisco Giants from 2007-2014. 

Zito helped the Giants win the World Series in 2012. In that series, he was 1-0 with a 1.59 earned run average.

Photo by Steve Nesius / AP

Raul Ibanez

Raul Ibanez won the Hutch Award in 2013.

His 19-year career included stints with the Seattle Mariners (three times), Kansas City Royals (twice), Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim.

In 2013, Ibanez became the oldest player in major league history to hit 20 home runs before the All-Star break. 

Photo by Steve Nesius / AP

Alex Gordon

Alex Gordon won the Hutch Award in 2014.

Gordon has been a Kansas City Royal since 2007. In those eight years, he has amassed more than 1,000 hits, including 244 doubles and 121 home runs.

ā€œIā€™m truly honored to have my name associated with Mr. Hutch,ā€ Gordon said at the 2015 Hutch Award Luncheon, where he accepted the honor.

Photo by Orlin Wagner / AP

Adam Wainwright

St. Louis Cardinals pitcher Adam Wainwright began his MLB career as a relief pitcher and became a closer at the end of his rookie season in 2006. He saved the series-cliching game of both the National League Championship series and World Series that year, and he became a starting pitcher the next season. He has been with the St Louis Cardinals since 2005.

Wainwright as won more than 100 games, and he has been selected as an All-Star three times.

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