Media Coverage Archive 2018

Media Coverage

Media Coverage Archive 2018

This page contains a listing of news items featuring Fred Hutch.  Older items may be located in the archive to the left.

Nature.com, April 17, 2018
An article on circadian rhythm and the timing of drug delivery referenced research by Dr. Eric Holland, who leads the Human Biology Division at Fred Hutch. His work “has shown that corticosteroids can reduce the effectiveness of radiation therapy in humans and that there are optimal times to administer radiation in mice,” the story said.
Xconomy, April 16, 2018
An article on the development of advanced immunotherapies to treat lung cancer – possibly even sidestepping the need for chemotherapy – described a new measure, called tumor mutational burden, that is emerging as a way to predict which patients may respond well to immunotherapy. Dr. Gary Lyman, health economist and oncologist at Fred Hutch, comments on the work.
Healio, April 14, 2018
The American Association for Cancer Research announced that Dr. Gary Gilliland, Fred Hutch president and director, has been elected a fellow of the AACR Academy, a recognition of contributions “to significant innovation and progress against cancer.”
The Lancet, April 13, 2018
In an obituary in The Lancet, Dr. Gary Gilliland, Fred Hutch president and director, and Dr. Garnet Anderson, senior vice president and director of the Public Health Sciences Division, commented on the vision and leadership of Dr. Robert Day, Fred Hutch president and director from 1981 to 1997. Day moved the Hutch to its current location and oversaw the creation of the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance.
Health.com, April 12, 2018
This article on spring being a good time to lose weight mentions a Fred Hutch study showing that certain people lose weight when they add a vitamin D supplement.
MIT Technology Review, April 11, 2018
Dr. Hans-Peter Kiem, a Fred Hutch oncologist, stem cell and gene therapy researcher, is quoted in this story about the gene-editing tool CRISPR, which may allow doctors to cure some diseases by altering a patient’s DNA. “Since monkeys are so similar to humans, I don’t think there’s going to be a huge challenge in translating this work to humans,” he said.
GeekWire, April 10, 2018
Dr. Jay Mendoza has been named director of the Fred Hutch Health Disparities Research Center and associate director of two related programs. “In the roles, Mendoza will lead cancer outreach and education efforts in much of Western Washington with the goal of improving cancer-related public health efforts in the region,” GeekWire said.
The Seattle Times, April 10, 2018
Jeanette Woldseth, who became Washington’s first paid female firefighter when she joined the Bellevue Fire Department in 1977, died in February after a battle with cancer. The Seattle Times said Woldseth, who started biking several years ago to participate in Fred Hutch’s annual Obliteride, raised $51,000 for research over the years.
The Seattle Times, April 10, 2018
The Seattle Times editorial board said the Rev. Dr. Samuel B. McKinney, the longtime pastor of Mount Zion Baptist Church and civil rights leader who died April 7, was “a giant.” Noting that McKinney served on the boards of many organizations including the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the article said, “McKinney was a man of conscience and integrity, widely respected throughout the Greater Seattle area for his work in many realms, from civil rights to economic justice to education to interfaith relations.”
Cancer Therapy Advisor, April 9, 2018
A new study found that men who took finasteride for seven years had reduced risk for prostate cancer throughout 16 years of follow-up. “One concern with these kinds of interventions is that while people are taking the intervention that prostate cancer may be prevented, but then rates snap back once the intervention is discontinued. That did not happen here. The preventive benefit of finasteride was maintained over the 16 years,” said Dr. Joseph Unger, assistant member of the Cancer Prevention Program.
INSIDER, March 28, 2018
A story that went viral in 2017 launched a wave of inaccurate stories about women acquiring male DNA from sexual partners. Not true, said Dr. J. Lee Nelson, a Fred Hutch autoimmunity researcher and rheumatologist. She explained that the most common source of male DNA in adult women is from prior pregnancy with a male child and how the mixing of DNA could benefit health.
KING-TV, March 28, 2018
In final preparation for his March 27 departure to Nepal to climb Mount Everest, biotech journalist Luke Timmerman told KING-TV that his biggest concern was leaving his family for the 10-week adventure. Timmerman has raised more than $328,000 for cancer research at Fred Hutch, and his progress has been followed by GeekWire, area TV and radio stations and other outlets.
Healio, March 27, 2018
Dr. Paul Nghiem, a dermatologist and affiliate investigator at Fred Hutch, talked with Healio’s Hem/Onc Today about the rapid increase in incidence of Merkel cell carcinoma. Nghiem and colleagues expect this aggressive skin cancer’s incidence to “continue to increase through 2025 because of the strong link between risk and advancing age.”
AJMC, American Journal of Managed Care, March 26, 2018
The American Journal of Managed Care reported on a presentation by Fred Hutch’s Dr. John Thompson on immune-related adverse events that can occur with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors. “With the good news has come some not so good news,” he said at the annual conference of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.
Smithsonian.com, March 23, 2018
Dr. Keith Jerome, a virologist at Fred Hutch, co-authored a 2016 study about gene editing in herpes-infected mice. “His is the first study to show that gene-editing technology can reach the latent virus in a nerve cell, and the first to use that technology to damage some of the virus’ DNA,” according to a Smithsonian.com article on this and other efforts to combat the virus in humans.
Seattle Business magazine (seattlebusinessmag.com), March 23, 2018
In a commentary in Seattle Business magazine, Chrissy Glaister, the lead usability engineer at Product Creation Studio in Seattle, spotlighted Fred Hutch spinout 2Morrow as one of the local companies developing lifestyle-improvement apps. “The company’s programs were created in collaboration with – and based on research by – Jonathan Bricker from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center,” she said.
Cancer Therapy Adviser, March 22, 2018
Dr. Ruth Etzioni, a biostatistician in Fred Hutch’s Public Health Sciences Division, discussed recent studies showing that African-American men with prostate cancer tend to have significantly worse survival outcomes than white men. Research indicates the cancer grows more rapidly in black men, but Etzioni said timing of screenings, quality of surgical centers and other factors need to be considered.
Puget Sound Business Journal, March 21, 2018
Dr. Gary Gilliland, Fred Hutch president and director, said the Amazon-JPMorgan Chase-Berkshire Hathaway partnership aimed at driving down health care costs could help change the industry for the better, but it won’t be easy because this is new territory for the companies and there are many complexities to confront.
The Atlantic, March 21, 2018
Centromeres are a specialized region on chromosomes, and malfunctioning centromeres have been linked to disorders and diseases like cancers. An Atlantic article on researchers working to put together the last missing pieces of the human genome quotes geneticist Dr. Steve Henikoff, who studies centromeres at Fred Hutch. “If you want to look at a human variation, I think this is the place to look,” he said.
Healio, March 20, 2018
Dr. Kedar Kirtane, a fellow in the Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program at Fred Hutch discussed a retrospective study he and colleagues conducted that found that racial minorities with blood cancers had lower rates of advance directives and received significantly more aggressive care than white patients. Kirtane said providers need to do a better job of discussing palliative care and advanced care planning, especially for historically disadvantaged groups.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Fred Hutch host Black History Month Gathering
KZJO-TV, Q13 news in the morning, Feb. 25, 2018
Q13 News in the Morning summarized a Feb. 24 Black History Month event: “Dozens gathered in celebration of Black History Month at a local church in Seattle yesterday. The focus was on resilience and strength through building community. Mount Zion Baptist Church hosted the event along with representatives from Fred Hutch Diversity Council. Keynote speakers included Seattle’s interim police chief and other local leaders.”

Herald.net, Feb. 24, 2018
Leslie Tidball, 64, is lead prosecutor for the city of Everett, a lifelong athlete who took up ice skating 15 years ago and a founder of the Snohomish County Women’s Ice Hockey team, according to a HeraldNet feature story. “On Aug. 9, 2015, she summited Mount Rainier to benefit the Fred Hutchinson Climb to Fight Breast Cancer. She climbed 14,411 feet in honor of her mother, now 89, who is a five-year breast cancer survivor,” the article reports. “She raised over $7,000 and reached the mountaintop in three days.”
Redmond Reporter, Feb. 23, 2018
Firefighters from the Redmond Fire Department will participate in the 27th Annual Scott Firefighter Stair Climb March 11 at the Columbia Center in Seattle. The fundraiser attracts firefighters from around the world and raises money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, which locally funds research at Fred Hutch, according to the Redmond Reporter.
Healio, Feb. 22, 2018
Dr. Rachel B. Salit, assistant member of the Clinical Research Division, reported on a clinical trial using a new drug, ruxolitinib (Jakafi) before stem cell transplantation in patients with myelofibrosis, a serious bone marrow disorder. According to this Healio article, the drug appeared safe and aided in the prevention of cytokine release syndrome, which can produce life-threatening systemic symptoms.
Targeted Oncology, Feb. 22, 2018
Dr. David Maloney, a member of the Fred Hutch Clinical Research Division, in an interview with Targeted Oncology, talked about a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy directed against a specific antigen, CD19, in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. “By being able to give the T cells in a defined mixture of CD4 and CD8 cells, we get a better relationship between the dose response and the dose toxicity,” he said.
FierceBiotech, Feb. 22, 2018
Japanese drugmaker Takeda has teamed up with Fred Hutch and the University of Washington to focus on developing drugs to treat cancer, gastrointestinal disease and neurological disorders. The collaboration is dubbed The Seattle Partnership for Research on Innovative Therapies, or SPRInT.
Medscape, Feb. 22, 2018
Asked to comment on a new study about targeted drugs for chronic myeloid leukemia, Fred Hutch’s Dr. Jerald Radich said the newer-generation nilotinib is probably better than the first-generation drug for achieving a deep and lasting response, but it has more cardiovascular complications, is more expensive, and there are no clear long-term survival differences. Radich, chair of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network CML Guidelines Committee, was not involved in this study, but has participated in others. The Reuters Health story ran in Medscape and other outlets.
Cancer Network, Feb. 21, 2018
Black men have had much higher mortality rates from prostate cancer than white men, but that disparity appears to have narrowed since the widespread adoption of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1990s. Dr. Ruth Etzioni, biostatistician in the Public Health Sciences Division, led a study finding that the narrowing of disparities is not as significant as believed.
Puget Sound Business Journal, Feb. 21, 2018
The Puget Sound Business Journal selected the Allen Institute for Brain Science, launched in 2003 by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, as Innovator of the Year. “If you want to pick an organization that would truly be identified as on the cutting edge of innovation, boy they're it,” said Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center President and Director Dr. Gary Gilliland. “We all benefit from the fact that they do this as an open-sourced approach.” Fred Hutch was Puget Sound Business Journal’s Innovator of the Year in 2017.
CNN, Feb. 21, 2018
In a CNN story that appeared in numerous outlets, Dr. Seth Pollack, assistant member of the Clinical Research Division, commented on personalized cancer vaccines, a form of immunotherapy. Pollack spoke about the evolving science of cancer vaccines and how they’ve shown promise in treating some types of sarcoma.
GeekWire, Feb. 21, 2018
Seattle startup 2Morrow Inc. released a pain management app based on the same scientific foundations of its earlier apps for smoking cessation and weight loss. “Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center clinical psychologist Jonathan Bricker, whose work formed the basis for 2Morrow’s smoking cessation app, described in a past interview how app staples like push notifications and gamification can keep users engaged and encourage them to stick to their treatment plan,” said a GeekWire story.
The Seattle Times, Feb. 20, 2018
Regarding ongoing debates about the potential health benefits of cocoa, The Seattle Times mentioned a study being conducted by Fred Hutch and Brigham and Women’s Hospital: “COSMOS, or COcoa Supplement and Multivitamin Outcomes Study, is investigating whether taking daily supplements of 600 mg of cocoa flavanols or a common multivitamin reduces the risk for developing heart disease and stroke, as well as cancer.”
OncLive, Feb. 20, 2018
Dr. David Maloney, medical director of cellular immunotherapy at Fred Hutch, participated in an OncLive discussion for researchers and clinicians on JCAR017, a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy in clinical trials for B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Maloney said clinical trial leaders have reported “very encouraging activities.”
Cure, Feb. 20, 2018
Dr. John A. Thompson, a member of the Clinical Research Division, was quoted in a curetoday.com article about new guidelines released by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the American Society of Clinical Oncology to help patients and health care teams understand and manage immunotherapy-related toxicities, particularly with checkpoint inhibitors. Thompson was a leader on both organizations’ panels developing the guidelines.
Seattle Business Magazine, Feb. 19, 2018
Seattle Business Magazine article describes progress by SEngine, founded in 2015 as a Fred Hutch spinoff, in identifying which cancer drugs will likely work based on the DNA of a patient’s cancer.
GeekWire, Feb. 18, 2018
A GeekWire story reported that former Vice President Joe Biden said in a speech to the American Association for the Advancement of Science that the U.S. should be dramatically increasing investments in research and noted research at Fred Hutch and other Seattle institutions for advancements in treating cancer.
ASCO Cancer.net, Feb. 14, 2018
Dr. Gary H. Lyman, co-director of the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), presented a cancer.net podcast to help patients understand “biosimilars,” drugs that are created to be very similar to existing biological treatments. Lyman was the lead author of a position statement on biosimilars in cancer treatment, released Feb. 14 by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
NBC local affiliate in Florida, Jan. 18, 2018
Hutch researchers Dr. Irwin Bernstein and Dr. Soheil Meshinchi talked about a drug developed at Fred Hutch. Mylotarg made its debut in 2000, but was taken off the market 10 years later. Now it’s back, and patients with a certain form of acute myeloid leukemia are showing a 35 to 40 percent increase in survival.
The Cancer Letter, Jan. 12, 2018
In a tribute, Dr. Gary Gilliland talked about working with Dr. Robert W. Day and the last accomplishments the former president made, including moving the Fred Hutch campus to its current location in South Lake Union.
The Atlantic, Jan. 12, 2018
Biologist Dr. Harmit Malik, of the Fred Hutch Basic Sciences Division, was quoted in a story in The Atlantic about Arc, a difficult-to-study gene that looks like a virus and influences learning and memory, apparently by helping neurons share genetic information among themselves.
Reuters, Jan. 9, 2018
Commenting on a study about racial and socioeconomic health care disparities among elderly patients with lung cancer, Fred Hutch’s Dr. Veena Shankaran said cultural and community beliefs may play a role in treatment decisions, but “many studies have shown that black patients have less access to cancer care and worse cancer outcomes than whites.”
The Seattle Times, Jan. 4, 2018
Microsoft will partner with Adaptive Biotechnologies, which was formed in 2009 with Fred Hutch technology, to develop blood tests that will “alert doctors when people are fighting specific diseases.
STAT, Jan. 1, 2018
Hutch epidemiologist Dr. Noel Weiss commented on a recent article in Annals of Internal Medicine suggesting that too much screening for certain cancers can skew our view of risk factors.
ASH Clinical News, Jan. 1, 2018
In an American Society of Hematology Q&A, Hutch president and director Dr. Gary Gilliland talks about the people and events that inspired him to become a doctor and specialize in hematology.
KIRO-TV, Jan. 1, 2018
In a story featuring Bridgette Hempstead, founder of the Cierra Sisters, a support group for black women with breast cancer, Dr. Nancy Davidson, senior vice president and director of the Clinical Research Division, said there is a common and false misconception that nothing can be done about a breast cancer diagnosis.