Fred Hutch history

Hutch Magazine

Timeline: 40 years of cures

Groundbreaking ceremony, 1973

Arnold Library Archive

1975

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center’s doors open at 1124 Columbia St. on Seattle’s First Hill. Founded by Dr. Bill Hutchinson and named in honor of his brother, Fred Hutch launched with several research programs, including one devoted to bone marrow transplantation that was led by Dr. E. Donnall Thomas, who pioneered the procedure.

1976

The Hutch establishes world’s first pediatric bone marrow transplant program

1977

First patient successfully treated with a transplant of his own bone marrow (autologous transplant)

1979

First patient successfully transplanted from unrelated marrow donor (allogeneic transplant)

1981

Dr. Bill Hutchinson retires as president and director;
Dr. Robert W. Day takes the helm

Dr. Robert W. Day, 1994

Arnold Library Archive


1982

Nation’s first Cancer Prevention Program established at the Hutch

1986

Researchers first treat graft-vs.-host disease using methotrexate plus cyclosporine, now the gold standard

Fred Hutch campus with Mt. Rainer in view

Arnold Library Archive

1988

Seven acres of land purchased for Fred Hutch’s new South Lake Union campus, then the second-largest land acquisition in Seattle history behind Seattle Center

1990

Dr. E. Donnall Thomas wins Nobel Prize for pioneering work in bone marrow transplantation

Dr. E. Donnall Thomas

Photo courtesy of Nobel Foundation


1991

First transplant performed using stem cells collected from a patient’s blood instead of bone marrow (autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant)

Science Education Partnership established to provide science teachers with hands-on training in research labs


1997

Dr. Lee Hartwell becomes third president and director

1998

Fred Hutch formed Seattle Cancer Care Alliance in partnership with UW Medicine and Seattle Children’s to broaden its clinical impact; every year, more than 6,000 new cancer patients are treated at SCCA, which is situated on the Hutch campus

1999

The 70-unit Pete Gross House, named after the Seattle Seahawks’ Ring of Honor member who passed away in 1992, opens to accommodate transplant patients and their families

Pete Gross House

Photo by Robert Hood / Fred Hutch


2000

Cancer survivor Ted Kennedy Jr. delivers keynote address at 25th anniversary celebration

The Hutch is chosen as the headquarters of the global HIV Vaccine Trials Network


2001

Dr. Lee Hartwell awarded Nobel Prize for discovering mechanisms that control cell division in yeast

Dr. Lee Hartwell

Photo courtesy of Nobel Foundation


2002

Long-term follow-up studies of blood stem cell transplant patients reveal majority regain normal immune function after treatment

Hutch researchers play key role in a Women’s Health Initiative study that finds combination hormone-replacement therapy increases the risk of breast cancer and other potentially fatal diseases


2003

Philanthropist Donald Listwin donates $10 million to Fred Hutch for early detection research

Hutch basic scientists use yeast to uncover mechanisms and molecules relevant in age-related cancer development, a finding Discover magazine lists among the year’s top 20 science stories


2004

Fred Hutch’s Dr. Linda Buck receives Nobel Prize for shedding new light on olfaction, or sense of smell
 
  Groundbreaking collaboration initiated between the Hutch and the Uganda Cancer Institute to help millions globally by developing effective prevention and treatment strategies for infection-associated cancers

Dr. Linda Buck

Photo by Roland Morgan


2005

Board member Robert M. Arnold donates $15 million to the Hutch

2007

Dr. Mark Roth wins MacArthur Fellowship “genius” award for research in suspended animation

2008

Clinical researchers put advanced melanoma into long-term remission using only a patient’s own cloned T cells

2009

Bezos family donates $10 million as a challenge gift to advance the field of cancer immunotherapy

2010

Clinical researchers report first successful use of expanded umbilical cord blood units to treat leukemia

Fred Hutch acquires the 1100 Eastlake Ave. E. building to house the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division

Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention and Fred Hutch sign an agreement to begin collaborating on research, training projects in China and the U.S. 


2011

Dr. Lawrence Corey, a leader in infectious-disease research, becomes fourth president and director

The Hutch is selected to lead $20 million, federally funded research project to explore potential cure for HIV infection using stem cell transplantation

2012

Hutch researchers discover: molecular underpinnings of a form of muscular dystrophy; how to break through a pancreatic cancer treatment barrier; and immune responses that correlate with protection in the “Thai trial,” the first HIV vaccine trial to show protection

Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research launched  

Dr. E. Donnall Thomas, “father of bone marrow transplantation,” dies at 92; around 1 million worldwide have undergone the procedure


2013

Fred Hutch, Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center join forces to launch Juno Therapeutics Inc.

Formation of Solid Tumor Translational Research


2014

The Bezos family donates $20 million for immunotherapy research

2015

Dr. D. Gary Gilliland, an internationally renowned
expert in cancer genetics and precision medicine,
becomes fifth president and director

Dr. Gary Gilliland

Photo by Robert Hood