Hutch News

BCPT symposium April 19: Epidemiologist Bernstein to speak

Leslie Bernstein will discuss lifestyle practices and breast cancer at the annual Biobehavioral Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program symposium

April 2, 2012
Dr. Leslie Bernstein

Dr. Leslie Bernstein will present "Lifestyle Practices: Impact on Breast Cancer Risk and Prognosis" at the 7th annual Biobehavioral Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program symposium on April 19.

Photo courtesy of Dr. Leslie Bernstein

Dr. Leslie Bernstein will present "Lifestyle Practices: Impact on Breast Cancer Risk and Prognosis" at the 7th annual Biobehavioral Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program symposium Thursday, April 19, 4-5 p.m. in the Arnold Building, M1-305.

Following the talk, from 5-7:15 p.m., the BCPT program will hold a reception and poster presentation in the Arnold Atrium. The posters will showcase the research of the program's trainees and affiliates.

Guest speaker background

Initially trained as a biostatistician, Bernstein developed a cancer epidemiology research program with a primary focus on breast cancer early in her research career. Today she is professor and director of the Department of Cancer Etiology in the Division of Populations Sciences at the City of Hope National Medical Center.

Her major research interests focus on:

  • How endogenous and exogenous hormones, physical activity and obesity influence breast cancer risk.
  • How personal and lifestyle risk factors interact with breast cancer treatment to affect the subsequent risk of other chronic diseases such as a second primary breast cancer, endometrial cancer, stroke and myocardial infarction.
  • How diet, obesity and physical activity affect breast cancer prognosis and influence the breast cancer survivor's quality of life.

The BCPT program

The Biobehavioral Cancer Prevention and Control Training Program works to train public health researchers, health services researchers and health policy analysts in biobehavioral and outcomes research, communications and practice outcomes as applied to cancer prevention and control.

The three-year training consists of a combination of didactic coursework and hands-on practical experience in interdisciplinary research through participation in new and existing research projects on cancer prevention and on health services research and policy (outcomes of prevention and care, including quality of life and cost-effectiveness).

Funding for the BCPT comes from a five-year training grant from the National Cancer Institute. Upon completion of the program, trainees will be qualified to become independent researchers in biobehavioral research and interventions, communications and outcomes research as applied to cancer prevention and control.

The program is under the direction of Dr. Donald Patrick of the University of Washington.

For more information, please visit the BCPT program website or contact Evan Prenovitz at preno@uw.edu.

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