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Hutch News

Stories tagged 'David Fredricks'

Microbiome research refines HIV risk for women

For the first time, seven species of vaginal bacteria linked to higher HIV susceptibility

Jan. 25, 2018 | By Sabin Russell / Fred Hutch News Service

Drawing from data collected for years by AIDS researchers in six African nations, scientists have pinpointed seven bacterial species whose presence in high concentrations may significantly increase the risk of HIV infection in women.

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Good News at Fred Hutch

Celebrating faculty and staff achievements

June 22, 2017

A new algorithm created by Dr. Philip Bradley and colleagues could aid the development of tools to decode T-cell receptor sequences and, ultimately, improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancers, reported this week in Nature.

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Nov. 21, 2016

What science is discovering about the trillions of microscopic organisms that share your body.

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Nov. 21, 2016

The new microbiome frontier provides ripe space for scientists — and hucksters.

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Exploring the human gut microbiome

Scientific interest in this diverse world of bacteria has flipped from fear to fascination

Jan. 22, 2016 | By Sabin Russell / Fred Hutch News Service

Stool samples in the Lampe Lab at Fred Hutch yield clues to the human gut microbiome, which is a diverse world of trillions of bacteria whose complex interactions keep us all alive, occasionally threaten our health and may hold secrets to preventing cancer or improving the lives of patients going through treatment for it.

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The microbiome’s murky role in pregnancy loss and complication

The same vaginal bacteria linked to promotion — and prevention — of various pregnancy complications, studies find

Aug. 21, 2015 | By Dr. Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

A study published recently by scientists at Temple University and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that the very same bacteria can have entirely different effects on women’s risk of premature delivery or miscarriage. And that dichotomy — one bacteria causing help and harm — has researchers both baffled and intrigued.

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