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Stories tagged 'triple-negative breast cancer'

Q & A with Dr. Peggy Porter: Targeted breast cancer treatments require diverse research data

Breast cancer researcher discusses need to extend research and results to minority women

Oct. 26, 2017 | By Sabrina Richards and Diane Mapes / Fred Hutch News Service

Personalized breast cancer treatments must come to everyone -- and that requires study data from diverse populations, says breast cancer researcher Dr. Peggy Porter.

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Combating breast cancer health disparities with education, support

'Knowledge, empowerment — that's what we do': Breast cancer patient Bridgette Hempstead shares her inspiring Cierra Sisters story

Oct. 17, 2017 | By Diane Mapes / Fred Hutch News Service

Breast cancer patients Sandra Evans and Bridgette Hempstead tell the story of the African-American cancer support group Cierra Sisters, which has gone on to help hundreds of Seattle men and women since Hempstead founded it shortly after her diagnosis.

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Lehman launches Ugandan breast cancer early detection project

International GE cancer challenge nets seed funding for Connie Lehman, who aims to raise breast cancer survival rates through ultrasound use in rural women

April 2, 2012 | By Dean Forbes

With seed funding from an international grant competition sponsored by GE, radiologist Dr. Constance Lehman of the Public Health Sciences Division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center will launch a pilot project to study the effectiveness of portable ultrasound for early detection of breast cancer among women in rural Uganda. Her project was one of five chosen for initial funding as part of the GE "Healthymagination Cancer Challenge."

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Obesity, inactivity may increase risk of breast cancers

Study finds women with highest body fat face higher risk of ’triple-negative’ and estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers; risk drops with fitness gains

March 14, 2011

Women’s Health Initiative researchers found a relationship between obesity, physical activity and triple-negative breast cancer, a subtype of breast cancer characterized by a lack of estrogen, progesterone and HER2 expression. Triple-negative breast cancers account for about 10 percent to 20 percent of all breast cancers and are associated with an extremely poor prognosis due to a lack of targeted drug therapies.

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Births raise risk of ‘triple-negative’ breast cancer

Study finds the more times a woman gives birth, the higher her risk of rare, aggressive breast cancer, while never giving birth offers protective effect

Feb. 28, 2011 | By Kristen Woodward

Full-term pregnancy has long been associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer, but a new study by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center finds that the more times a woman gives birth, the higher her risk of “triple-negative” breast cancer, a relatively uncommon but particularly aggressive subtype of the disease. Conversely, women who never give birth have a 40 percent lower risk of such breast cancer, which has a poorer prognosis than other types of breast cancer and doesn’t respond to hormone-blocking therapies such as tamoxifen.

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Study links birth-control pill to rare breast cancer

Kathi Malone and colleagues associate oral contraceptive use with high risk of triple-negative breast cancer in young women

May 4, 2009 | By Colleen Steelquist

A new Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center study reveals that a year or more of oral contraceptive use was associated with a 4.2-fold increased risk of triple-negative breast cancer for women 40 and under. Longer duration of use and early age of first use further increased risk. Researchers did not find increased risk from pill use among women 41 to 45 years of age.

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