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Stories tagged 'computational biology'

Will the flu vaccine work for you? Answer may be in your genes

Set of 9 genes that predicts flu response in adults under 35 could be first step to personalized vaccine

Aug. 31, 2017 | By Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

A newly uncovered set of genes that predicts whether the flu shot will work or not could be the first step toward a personalized flu vaccine.

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A big-picture look at the world’s worst Ebola epidemic

International team of scientists show how real-time sequencing and data-sharing can help stop the next outbreak

April 12, 2017 | By Mary Engel / Fred Hutch News Service

An international team of scientists analyzed 1,610 Ebola virus genomes for the most comprehensive look to date at the how the 2013-2016 epidemic spread, proliferated and declined across the three West African countries most affected.

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A Q&A with Fred Hutch's Dr. Trevor Bedford

'Trying to be useful instead of trying to be clever': An evolutionary biologist-virologist-immunologist-computer-wonk finds his niche

Dec. 21, 2016 | By Mary Engel / Fred Hutch News Service

Fred Hutch's Dr. Trevor Bedford takes time away from figuring out how flu strains move around the world and wrangling Zika metadata to explain how he came to do what he does — and just what that entails.

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How cells sense and respond to the outside world

Cells employ unexpected method to respond to environmental cues

Oct. 28, 2016 | By Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

A new study, published in the journal Cell Systems and which was led by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center molecular biologist Dr. Roger Brent and computational biologist Dr. Steven Andrews, addresses the molecular chain of events that occurs when cells receive external information.

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HIV vaccine: Could a few special cells help protect millions of people?

New analysis finds rare immune cells linked to HIV vaccine’s effectiveness

May 28, 2015 | By Dr. Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

There are several kinds of immune responses that could protect against HIV infection. A new analysis has now found that a small but important subset of the immune cells known as T cells may be important for a working HIV vaccine.

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The FedEx factor: How handling and storage of patient blood samples can impact cancer research

New study reveals how a seemingly major leukemia discovery turned scientific cautionary tale about how standard blood collection can alter results

Nov. 10, 2014 | By Dr. Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

Fred Hutch's Drs. Heidi Dvinge and Robert Bradley discovered that abnormalities in a molecule called RNA were not triggered by leukemia, as previously thought, but by the manner in which blood samples from cancer patients were being stored.

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