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Stories tagged 'cancer deaths'

Double down on cancer cures

Fred Hutch president urges twofold boost in US cancer-research funding

May 5, 2016 | By Dr. Gary Gilliland

In a commentary, Dr. Gary Gilliland writes: If ever there was a moment to double down on our national cancer-research investment, the time is now.

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The conversation: When talking about death means talking about life

Dr. Tony Back, featured in an upcoming documentary, teaches doctors to talk to their patients about end of life

Oct. 17, 2014 | By Mary Engel / Fred Hutch News Service

Dr. Anthony Back remembers precisely the moment he resolved to help fellow doctors learn to talk with their patients—and each other—about dying.

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Tobacco-control efforts prevented 800,000 lung cancer deaths

Mathematical modeling by Center researchers shows national anti-smoking campaign made significant impact on mortality rates between 1975 and 2000

March 19, 2012 | By Kristen Woodward

Declines in cigarette smoking among Americans since the mid-1950s—particularly since tobacco-control policies and interventions were implemented after the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health was released in 1964—prevented nearly 800,000 lung cancer deaths between 1975 and 2000, according to a study led by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center researchers.

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Breast cancer: Estrogen-only pills may cut long-term risk

Led by Garnet Anderson, latest Women's Health Initiative study shows more than 20 percent reduction in cancer risk, 63 percent reduction in deaths for short-term estrogen users

March 12, 2012

Women who used the estrogen-only form of hormone replacement therapy were more than 20 percent less likely to develop breast cancer and remained significantly less likely to die from the disease than those who never used HRT, according to new Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center research led by Dr. Garnet Anderson, left.

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Study confirms body weight influences Asians’ risk of death

Researchers find both high and low body-mass index impact mortality in more than 1 million East and South Asians

Feb. 28, 2011

A study by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center researcher Dr. John Potter of more than 1 million Asians found that those who were a normal weight were far less likely to die from any cause than individuals whose body-mass index was too high or low. A similar association was seen between BMI and the risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease or other causes.

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