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Hutch News

Stories tagged 'broadly neutralizing antibodies'

Cutting-edge approach maps HIV's escape routes

Atlas of immune-evading HIV mutations could inform design of new treatments, vaccines

Jan. 29, 2019 | By Sabrina Richards / Fred Hutch News Service

Fred Hutch scientists have constructed an atlas of mutations that HIV uses to escape broadly neutralizing antibodies, potent immune molecules that form our body’s first line of defense against the virus. The information could help guide researchers who are testing these antibodies’ potential to prevent or treat HIV infection, as well as those working to develop more effective preventive vaccines.

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HIV researcher Cassandra Simonich receives 2018 Graduate School Medal from University of Washington

Award honors her contributions to research and dedication to improving the lives of medically underserved populations

June 21, 2018 | By Colin Petersdorf / Fred Hutch News Service

Cassandra Simonich, an M.D./Ph.D. student conducting HIV-vaccine related research at Fred Hutch, has received the 2018 Graduate School Medal from the University of Washington.

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New library of HIV mutants could inform vaccine design

Laboratory manipulation of the AIDS-causing virus reveals evolutionary ‘dead-ends’

June 1, 2017 | By Rachel Tompa / Fred Hutch News Service

Fred Hutch researchers have created a library containing millions of mutant HIV viruses. Some of these mutants are very good at infecting human cells, no different from their “natural” viral ancestor. Some of them are worse. Together, they can teach researchers something important about HIV in humans.

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