Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division

Malaria

Malaria is potentially fueling the spread of HIV in areas of sub-Saharan Africa where there is a substantial overlap between the two diseases; while concurrently HIV may be playing a role in boosting adult malaria-infection rates in some parts of the region. Using mathematical modeling techniques, VIDD researchers have found that malaria can increase the viral load of an HIV-infected person on the order of 10-fold, thereby augmenting the risk of HIV transmission. Conversely, HIV may play a role in the geographic expansion of malaria due to the already-compromised immune system of HIV-infected individuals. VIDD research into this synergistic global health threat holds promise for ameliorating morbidity and mortality of such infectious diseases.

Faculty

Research Associate Professor, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Graduate Faculty, Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Director, Center for AIDS Research Immunology Core, University of Washington
Associate Director for Laboratory Science, HIV Vaccine Trials Network
Associate Professor, Department of Global Health, University of Washington
Graduate Faculty, Global Health, University of Washington
Affiliate Professor, Statistics, University of Washington
Phone: (206) 667-4076
Fax: (206) 667-4378
Associate Director for Laboratory Operations, HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN)
Principal Staff Scientist, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division
Principal Staff Scientist, Public Health Sciences Division
Clinical Associate Professor, Global Health, University of Washington
Senior Vice President and Director, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division
Professor of Medicine, University of Washington
Adjunct Professor, Pathobiology, Global Health, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington
Research centers on developing an HIV vaccine and investigating the complex relationship between HIV and the immune system.
Senior Staff Scientist, Public Health Sciences Division
Research focus: Vaccine clinical trials, SNP analysis, novel statistical methodology, nonparametric methods
Phone: (206) 667-7077
Fax: (206) 667-4378