Jonathan B. Bricker, PhD

Affiliate Associate Professor, Department of Psychology
University of Washington

Education:

PhD, Clinical Psychology, University of Washington, 2003.
MS, Clinical Psychology, University of Washington, 1999.
BA, Psychology & English, University of California, Berkeley, 1997.

Research Focus:

Dr. Bricker’s research focuses on the development and testing of innovative interventions for health behavior change. With over $10 million in NIH research funding, he and his team are conducting randomized clinical trials of acceptance and mindfulness therapy interventions for smoking cessation.  Technology-based platforms of intervention delivery include telephone coaching, websites, and smartphone apps.  He is also developing a separate line of research focusing on innovative behavioral approaches to weight loss.

Current Studies:

2015 to 2020             
Project Title:   Telephone-Delivered Acceptance Therapy for Smoking Cessation

Source of Support: NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse
Grant Type: R01 DA 038411
Role:  Principal Investigator
Goal: To compare the effectiveness of telephone-delivered ACT against traditional cognitive behavioral therapy for smoking cessation intervention in a fully powered RCT (Target N = 1168).  

2013 to 2018 
Project Title:   Randomized Trial of Web-Delivered Acceptance Therapy for Smoking Cessation
Source of Support: NIH/National Cancer Institute
Grant Type:  R01 CA 166646
Role: Principal Investigator
Goal: To compare the effectiveness of web-delivered ACT against the NCI’s web-delivered Smokefree.gov smoking cessation intervention in a fully powered RCT (Target N = 2552).  

2012 to 2016   
Project Title: Tobacco Use and Alcohol Misuse Among Participants of the Millennium Cohort  Study

Source of Support:  US Department of Veterans Affairs
Grant Type: VA’s R01 Equivalent (ZDA1-04-W10)
Role: Co-Investigator (PI: Edward Boyko, MD)
Goal: As part of a 21-year longitudinal study of 150,000 young adult military personnel, evaluate the role of pre-deployment, deployment, separation, and comorbid biopsychosocial risk factors that prospectively predict the incidence, persistence, and relapse of tobacco use and alcohol misuse. 



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Contact Information

Phone
(206) 667-5074
Fax
(206) 667-5977
Email
Additional contact

Mail Stop M3-B232