Youth & Adult Smoking Research

Major Findings

Youth Quitting Smoking

High rates of parental consent and adolescent recruitment and retention to smoking cessation interventions can be achieved using confidential cessation counseling that is personally-tailored, autonomy-supportive, and proactively delivered via the telephone.

A.V. Peterson, K.A. Kealey, S.L. Mann, P.M. Marek, E.J. Ludman, J. Liu, J.B. Bricker. Group-randomized trial of a proactive, personalized telephone counseling intervention for adolescent smoking cessation. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 101, Issue 20, pages 1378-1392. October 2009. Abstract

K.A. Kealey, E.J. Ludman, P.M. Marek, S.L. Mann, J.B. Bricker, A.V. Peterson. Design and implementation of an effective telephone counseling intervention for adolescent smoking cessation. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 101, Issue 20, pages 1393-1405. October 2009. Abstract

K.A. Kealey, E.J. Ludman, S.L. Mann, P.M. Marek, M.M. Phares, K.R. Riggs, A.V. Peterson. Overcoming barriers to recruitment and retention in adolescent smoking cessation. Journal of Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Vol. 9, Issue 2, pages 257-270, February 2007. Abstract

Youth Smoking Prevention

Consistent with previous long-term trials, the Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project demonstrated that there is no evidence that a school-based, social influences approach is effective in the long-term deterrence of smoking among youth.

A.V. Peterson, K.A. Kealey, S.L. Mann, P.M. Marek, and I.G. Sarason. Hutchinson Smoking Prevention Project: Long-term randomized trial in school-based tobacco use prevention – Results on smoking. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 92, No. 24, pages 1979-1991, December 2000. Abstract

Youth Smoking Acquisition: Parents' Anti-tobacco Attitudes and Actions

Parents who ask to sit in nonsmoking sections, ask others not to smoke around them, and don't allow smoking in the home reduce the risk that their children will smoke as teenagers.

M.R. Andersen, B.G. Leroux, J.B. Bricker, K.B. Rajan, and A.V. Peterson. Antismoking parenting practices are associated with reduced rates of adolescent smoking. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 158, No. 4, pages 348-352, April 2004. Abstract

Mothers' strong antismoking attitudes when their children are young are associated with reduced smoking by their children at 12th grade, but only when smoking behavior is consistent with these attitudes.

M.R. Andersen, B.G. Leroux, P.M. Marek, A.V. Peterson, K.A. Kealey, J.B. Bricker, and I.G. Sarason. Mothers' attitudes and concerns about their children smoking: Do they influence kids? Preventive Medicine, Vol. 34, Issue 2, pages 198-206, February 2002. Abstract

Parents' Smoking Behavior

The influence of parents' smoking was found to be substantial during adolescence for all smoking transitions (from never smoking to trying, trying to monthly, monthly to daily smoking) and increased significantly for the transition from monthly to daily smoking as the adolescent grew older. In contrast, the influence of close friends' smoking was strongest for the transition to trying smoking and did not significantly change for any of the smoking transitions as the adolescent became older.

J.B. Bricker, A.V. Peterson, I.G. Sarason, M.R. Andersen, and K.B. Rajan. Changes in the influence of parents' and close friends' smoking on adolescent smoking transitions. Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 32, Issue 4, pages 740-757, April 2007. Abstract

Having one parent who smokes doubles the risk that children will be daily smokers by 12th grade.

A.V. Peterson, B.G. Leroux, J.B. Bricker, K.A. Kealey, P.M. Marek, I.G. Sarason, and M.R. Andersen. Nine-year prediction of adolescent smoking by number of smoking parents. Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 31, Issue 5, pages 788-801, May 2006. Abstract

Parents who quit smoking when their children are young reduce the risk by more than a third that their children will be daily smokers at 12th grade.

J.B. Bricker, B.G. Leroux, A.V. Peterson, K.A. Kealey, I.G. Sarason, M.R. Andersen, and P.M. Marek. Nine-year prospective relationship between parental smoking cessation and children's daily smoking. Addiction, Vol. 98, Issue 5, pages 585-593, May 2003. Abstract

Siblings

Children with one or more older siblings who smoke are 1-1/2 times more likely to smoke than children with nonsmoking siblings.

K.B. Rajan, B.G. Leroux, A.V. Peterson, J.B. Bricker, M.R. Andersen, K.A. Kealey, and I.G. Sarason. Nine-year prospective association between older siblings' smoking and children's daily smoking. Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 33, Issue 1, pages 25-30, July 2003. Abstract

Smoking by one parent was associated with children making the transition to trying smoking, from trying smoking to monthly smoking, and from monthly smoking to daily smoking. Smoking by an older sibling was associated with children making the transition to trying smoking and making the transition from monthly to daily smoking; there was no association between sibling smoking and children's transition from trying to monthly smoking.

J.B. Bricker, A.V. Peterson, B.G. Leroux, M.R. Andersen, K.B. Rajan, and I.G. Sarason. Prospective prediction of children's smoking transitions: role of parents' and older siblings' smoking. Addiction, Vol. 101, Issue 1, pages 128-136, January 2006. Abstract

  

Young Adult Smoking Cessation

Parents quitting smoking when their children are young is associated with increased odds of their young adult children's smoking cessation.

J.B. Bricker, K.B. Rajan, M.R. Andersen, and A.V. Peterson. Does parental smoking cessation encourage their young adult children to quit smoking? A prospective study. Addiction, Vol. 100, Issue 3, pages 379-386, March 2005. Abstract