Assessment Tools

Breast Cancer Initiative 2.5 (BCI2.5)

Assessment Tools

BCI2.5 is developing situation analysis tools to aid countries in assessing need and identifying bottlenecks in breast health care delivery. BCI2.5 is also developing models to estimate the impact of providing early diagnosis and treatment interventions in different resource settings. These models will assist in determining the most effective and appropriate interventions in specific settings given available resources.

Baseline Assessments/Situation Analyses. In collaboration with partner countries or centers of excellence, BCI2.5 is supporting baseline assessments and situation analysis utilizing the BCI2.5 self-assessment tools, Global Breast Health Analytics Map (GloBAM), stakeholder mapping, focus groups and other methods as appropriate.


Breast Health Care Assessment Questionnaire

Breast Health Care Assessment Questionnaire 

Revised survey coming soon

 

Palliative Care Assessment Questionnarie

Take survey now 


Gilberto Lopes, MD, MBA

Gilberto Lopes, MD, MBA

"Over the last few decades we have made major progress in the treatment of cancer," said Gilberto de Lima Lopes, Jr., MD, MBA, FAMS, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine, Medical Director for International Programs and Leader, Global Oncology Program at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. "For no other disease this is as evident as it is for breast cancer. Not only have we developed treatments that increase cure rates but we have also been able to do so with procedures that are less disfiguring and with medications that cause fewer side effects. For those of us who practice in lower-resource settings, however, these gains represent hope for the future but are not our current reality.

Initiatives such as BCI2.5 are therefore fundamental in our fight against breast cancer in low and middle income countries. We expect that with multiple stakeholder engagement and technical transfer alongside the development of innovative and culturally-sensitive ways of addressing the disease we will be able to start closing this gap very shortly."