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Dr. Emily Hatch named 2018 Rita Allen Foundation Scholar

Recognized for her research on the rupture and repair of nuclear membranes that may cause cancer and other diseases
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How one protein helps cancer both spread and grow

Hutch scientists discover single molecule’s ‘intricate regulation’ of two key aspects of metastasis
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Adaptive evolution of testis-specific histones: a SeXY conflict?

The Malik Laboratory performs a detailed phylogenetic analysis of a protein family to better understand the diversity and function of short histone H2A variants.
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Microtubules turn down the static

The Brent Lab uses the pheromone response system (PRS) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study cell-to-cell variability in signaling.
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Artificial Intelligence Takes Scientists Inside Living Human Cells

A new application of artificial intelligence could help researchers solve medical mysteries ranging from cancer to Alzheimer's.
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Dr. Sue Biggins elected to American Academy of Arts & Sciences

Biologist is ninth Hutch researcher to join one of the nation's oldest learned societies.
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Transcriptional activators derive order from chaos

How are transcription factors so good at recruiting the right coactivator to the right place at the right time? The Hahn Laboratory seeks to answer this question by studying how the transcription factor Gcn4, a sensor of nutrient status, interacts with Med15, a component of the large coactivator complex known as Mediator.
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A slapdash virus relies on quantity over quality to achieve successful infections

The Bloom Laboratory strives to capture a more accurate picture of viral infections by using state-of-the-art sequencing methods
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Scientists-turned-entrepreneurs share lessons learned launching startups

When Dr. Mark Roth launched his first startup company in 2005, the biologist had a relatively straightforward goal: Translate the preliminary but promising results he’d seen in his Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center lab to a medical treatment that could actually help people.
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A space-time continuum in nervous system development

Using zebrafish as a model organism, the Moens Laboratory is investigating how vagus motor neurons originating in the hindbrain innervate pharyngeal arches, the developmental precursors of structures in the throat.
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A salt bath and a haircut clean up centromeric chromatin

The Henikoff Laboratory in the Basic Sciences Division is working to elucidate the structure of centromeric chromatin in greater detail.
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In search of a universal flu vaccine

Making a flu vaccine that will last longer than a season is a dream scientists have been chasing for years. Here’s how they’re working to make it a reality.
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Fred Hutch’s Katherine Xue among 2018 Weintraub Award recipients

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has announced the 2018 recipients of the annual Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, which recognizes outstanding achievement in graduate studies in the biological sciences.
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New technological platform opens unexplored world of tiny proteins

'Cystine-dense peptides' largely untapped source of new therapeutics for tough diseases.
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When scientific hypotheses don’t pan out

Research studies are often built around an educated guess. What happens when those guesses are wrong?
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Dr. Matthew Miller named Damon Runyon ‘Breakthrough Scientist’

Award follows Miller’s Damon Runyon postdoctoral fellowship, confers $100,000 in research funding.
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‘Waistbands’ of our chromosomes marked by unusual X-shaped DNA

Human Y chromosome’s center more ‘monkey-like’ than other human chromosomes, study finds.
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Immune cells share their insides with tumors to promote cancer spread

New study in zebrafish and mice shows immune cells interact with melanoma and transfer their contents to spur metastasis.
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Understanding HIV’s evolutionary past — and future

Studies of how the virus evolved and how it might change down the road could help researchers develop vaccines or cures for the infection.
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Dr. Sue Biggins named a 2017 ASCB fellow

The American Society for Cell Biology has named Fred Hutch biologist Dr. Sue Biggins as a fellow in the second year of its Fellows award program. Fellows awards are meant to honor scientists who have made lifetime achievements in the field of cell biology and have contributed significantly to the ASCB.
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Abraham Gutierrez (Biggins Lab) received a Graduate Student Oral Presentation Award from SACNAS.

Abraham Gutierrez was among 117 graduate and undergraduate students to receive award from The Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS).
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Fruit fly study IDs missing links in fat-signaling system

Hormone alerts brain to fat-storage status, but its packaging system goes awry in obesity.
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See this study also covered in King 5 News


One family, two sides of cancer

Basic scientist Dr. Wenying Shou’s parents were both treated for — and cured of — their cancers. The similarities end there.
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New nanoparticles make targeted, temporary gene therapy possible

‘Hit-and-run’ technology could improve immunotherapy and HIV cure research.
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From student to scientist to mentor

A science education program helped launch Louisa Pendergast’s research career. Now she’s helping mentor more science teachers at Fred Hutch.
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Dr. Robert Bradley receives Leukemia & Lymphoma Society award

Fred Hutch molecular and computational biologist Dr. Robert Bradley has been awarded a prestigious career development grant from the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society to support his blood cancer-related research, which focuses on how slight changes in fundamental processes in the cell can trigger the blood disease myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, and leukemia.
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What we can learn about global flu evolution from individual infections

Study of 10-year-old flu samples finds virus’s evolution in individual transplant patients partially mirrors later global trends.
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See Jesse Bloom and Katherine Xue's study also covered in:


'Wtf'? A gene that poisons its own host

Discovery of genes that divide two species in a simple fungus sheds light on complex evolutionary principles.
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New library of HIV mutants could inform vaccine design

There’s a small collection of test tubes stored in a laboratory freezer at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Hundreds of these freezers host thousands of tiny tubes, but this collection is different.
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Dr. James Priess elected to National Academy of Sciences

Basic scientist selected for his contributions to understanding the genes and mechanisms involved in development.
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Mentors matter, but how do you find one?

Making the mentoring relationship — or better, relationships — work.
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Tiny worm mazes allow researchers to ID genes linked to spatial perception, risk-taking

Could worms' few hundred neurons really distinguish a physical pattern in their surroundings? That's what Dr. Jihong Bai and his newly hired technician, Bicheng Han, wanted to figure out.
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Lisa Voelker (Bai Lab) and Jackie Lang (Biggins Lab) are among the 2017 Husky 100 recepients.

Each year, the Husky 100 recognizes 100 UW undergraduate and graduate students from Bothell, Seattle and Tacoma in all areas of study who are making the most of their time at the UW. 
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Fred Hutch/UW graduate student Qing Feng among this year’s 13 Weintraub award winners

Qing Feng, a graduate student in the joint University of Washington/Fred Hutch Molecular and Cellular Biology Graduate Program, is one of 13 recipients of the 2017 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award
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Can we talk about doing science and raising children?

Researchers open up about the unique challenges of starting families during training — and offer tips for juggling the dual demands.
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Sue Biggins: The Importance of Basic Sciences


See Division News Archive here.